Languages of Security in the Asia-Pacific

College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University

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Entries Tagged as 'Order'

Japanese – Chitsujo

May 27th, 2011 · No Comments · Japanese, Order

秩序 (ちつじょ) chitsujo Relates to order The term consists of two characters: 秩chitsu – regularity; order 序 jo – beginning; order; precedence; occasion; chance   This is a very important concept and there is strong support among Japanese for government action that contributes to the preservation of order. In English, ‘order’ has a policing connotation […]

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South Korean – Chilso

May 27th, 2011 · No Comments · Korean (South), Order

질서    (秩序) chilso Relates to order The term ‘chilso’ needs to be distinguished from the notion of security: it suggests the maintenance of order, particularly in the context of a system or structure. In giving the police the role of maintaining or protecting ‘chilso’, there is an implication of a broadening of police powers. The […]

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Indonesian – Ketertiban

May 27th, 2011 · No Comments · Indonesian, Order, Security

Ketertiban Relates to security, order, resilience Former Indonesian president Suharto shrewdly called his government ‘Orde Baru’ (The New Order) to distinguish it from the previous government, which he called ‘Orde Lama’ (The Old Order).  In a speech in 1978, he explicitly defined the Old Order as ‘a regime which had deviated from Pancasila (the five […]

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Karen – Tee Kaw Dta Ka Lu

May 27th, 2011 · No Comments · Karen, Order

Tee Kaw Dta Ka Lu Relates to order Literally: – Tee Kaw – State – Dta Ka Lu – Command/Order The Karen language does not have an expression to convey the meaning of order, as in the meaning of state of affairs or of maintaining a status quo. Rather, the Karen word for order  dta ka lu […]

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Burmese – Nyein wut pi pya yei

May 25th, 2011 · No Comments · Burmese, Order

Nyein wut pi pyā yēi Relates to law and order; public order Nyein wut pi pyā yēi features prominently in the state’s security discourse as a referent of security.  However, the term is ominous both in its tone and in its application, such that citizens often associate it with insecurity.  Moreover, the common translation of […]

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