Events March 2017

21
Mar
2017

The macroeconomic effects of Japan’s unconventional monetary policies

Professor Ryuzo Miyao, University of Tokyo.

Japan is the country with the longest history of implementing unconventional monetary policies, which were first introduced fifteen years ago and have since been expanded several times.

21
Mar
2017

Competition in information disclosure

Keiichi Kawai, University of New South Wales.

About the speaker

Keiichi Kawai, University of New South Wales.

Light lunch available.

21
Mar
2017

Security, legitimacy and public policy: transgovernmentalism and the architecture of Anglosphere policy networks

Tim Legrand
This presentation considers the dynamics and political implications of transgovernmental networks collaboration by considering three specific ‘security’ network cases: the Quintet of Attorneys-General; the Five Country Ministerial and the Five Countries Conference.
21
Mar
2017

The Future of Global Health Governance under the Trump Administration

Dr Jeremy Youde

The robust growth of global health governance over the past 30 years has signalled the importance attached to global health within international society.

21
Mar
2017

The not-so-hot melting pot: the persistence of outcomes for descendants of the age of mass migration

Zachary Ward, Research School of Economics, ANU.

Large skill gaps across different immigrant sources may remain for generations; however, convergence past the second generation is typically unknown because data rarely include grandparent’s country of birth.

21
Mar
2017

The Origins and Dynamics of Crony Capitalism in China: Insights from Prosecuted Cases of Collusive Corruption

Pei Minxin
Corruption in the post-Tiananmen era exhibits distinct characteristics not found in the 1980s, such as astronomical sums of money looted by officials, their family members, and their cronies in the private sector, large networks of co-conspirators, and the sale of public office. By examining the evolution of Chinese economic and political institutions since the early 1990s, we can trace the emergence of crony capitalism to two critical changes in the control of property rights of the assets owned by the state and the personnel management of the officials the ruling Communist Party.
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