Events April 2017

11
Apr
2017

The Impacts of Rural-Urban Migration on Rural Development: Evidence from China

Xinjie Shi
Mass migration has impacts on rural development in a number of ways, including the loss of labour, changes in household age and gender structure and off-farm income. Xinjie’s PhD research contributes to the existing realm of migration literature underpinned by the New Economics of Labour Migration (NELM), by providing new empirical evidence on the effects of lost-labour and non-agricultural earnings on agricultural output, productivity and rural incomes. This seminar will present the first of three papers that will make up Xinjie’s PhD, focusing on agricultural productivity.
11
Apr
2017

Critical analysis of current regulatory frameworks to encourage investment in solar PV in Indonesia

Dr James Prest
This presentation critically reviews the design, implementation and effectiveness of Indonesia’s 2016 and 2017 Feed in Tariff incentive laws for grid-connected utility-scale solar PV.
11
Apr
2017

US Foreign Policy under President Trump

Professor Valerie Hudson, Tom Switzer and Professor William (Bill) Tow

Prior to his election in November 2016, President Donald J. Trump's foreign policy outlook was the antithesis of the "Washington playbook": the bipartisan consensus to support allies, free trade, and liberal democratic values across the globe.

11
Apr
2017

Papua New Guinea after the resource boom

Marcel Schroder, PNG, ANU.

This talk provides a survey of recent economic developments in Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) since the end of the resource boom in 2014. The specific focus of the discussion will be on the country’s exchange rate policy.

11
Apr
2017

China’s Power and the Future of Australia

Professor Hugh White
Australia has never encountered an Asian country as powerful as China is today, and we have no idea how to deal with it. We still assume that America will be there to manage China’s rise and save us from choices we’d prefer not to face. But that assumption is no longer credible, so Australia must prepare to deal with a powerful China without US support. And to do that we must first think more carefully about the nature of Chinese power and what it means for Australia.
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