Events May 2018

14
Feb
2018

Upcoming CartoGIS Events

CartoGIS Services is hosting a number of events and drop-in sessions for academic staff and HDR students this semester.
26
Mar
2018

Asian Language Taster Classes

CAP language academics

Are you interested in learning another language? Seeking an edge in the “Asian Century”?

19
Apr
2018

GIS Basics for Research (GIS100)

Learn how to use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to support your research! In this course you’ll be shown how to navigate ArcGIS software.

01
May
2018

Cascades of Violence

John Braithwaite and Bina D’Costa
War and crime are cascade phenomena. War cascades across space and time to more war; crime to more crime; crime cascades to war; and war to crime. As a result, war and crime become complex phenomena. That does not mean we cannot understand how to prevent crime and war simultaneously.
01
May
2018

Rethinking student loan repayment burdens: evidence from Korea

Dung Doan, Research School of Economics, ANU.

A burgeoning pool of research argues that time-based repayment student loans (TBRLs) create an excessive repayment burden (RB), and thus contribute to hardship and a high risk of default among low-income graduate debtors.

03
May
2018

Sustainable green growth in agriculture: the role of regional cooperation

Kazi Zaman, PhD Scholar, Crawford School, ANU.

This study examines the effect of regional cooperation on sustainable green growth in agriculture.

03
May
2018

Encounters between Strangers. Law and Jewish Identity

Mareike Riedel

Jewish practices have come increasingly under legal and political pressure across several countries of the West.

03
May
2018

Determinants of innovation in manufacturing SMEs: evidence from Vietnam

Hang Hoang, PhD Student, CAMA.

In this seminar Hang Hoang presents the results of her investigation into the determinants of innovation in manufacturing SMEs in Vietnam. She uses binary logistic regression on survey data collected in 2005 and 2013.

03
May
2018

Enterprising Chinese Australians in the early 20th century: capital, sociability, and diaspora nationalism

Kuo Mei-fen
Taking the case of Chinese Australian businesses in the early twentieth century, this paper will show how community organizations produced and reproduced the dynamic processes of Chinese enterprises in order to enhance group mobility, social creativity, and commercial strategies.
03
May
2018

Rebuilding macroeconomic theory

David Vines, University of Oxford

In this talk David Vines will describe the Rebuilding Macroeconomic Theory Project, which led to a number of papers in the Oxford Review of Economics Policy, by authors including Paul Krugman, Olivier Blanchard, Joe Stiglitz and Simon Wren Lewis.

04
May
2018

Navigating the emerging world order - Melbourne

Associate Professor Michael Clarke and Dr Michael Cohen

The security landscape is changing rapidly. Challenges to the US-led security order are advancing faster than anticipated.

07
May
2018

Malaysia’s upcoming 14th General Elections

Dr John Funston (Visiting Fellow, ANU Coral Bell School); Dr Amrita Malhi (Visiting Fellow, ANU Coral Bell School); Dr Ross Tapsell (Director, ANU Malaysia Institute); Discussant and Chair: Ms Diana Anuar, The Youth Vote
As Malaysians head to the 14th General Elections (GE14), the stakes have seldom been higher. The nature of the nation is now fiercely contested.
07
May
2018

Hindi Taster Class

Dr Peter Friedlander

Hindi is the primary official language of India, and as such is crucial for a student with a passion for India and its culture and society.

07
May
2018

Involving men in ending violence against women: book launch

Dr Joyce Wu, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU; and Helen Szoke AO, Executive Director of Oxfam Australia.

Involving men to stop violence against women is a global trend, with celebrity-endorsed campaigns such as HeforShe and White Ribbon being hailed as progress in changing male behaviour.

08
May
2018

Navigating the emerging world order - Adelaide

Dr Jennifer Hunt and Dr Tim Legrand

The security landscape is changing rapidly. Challenges to the US-led security order are advancing faster than anticipated.

08
May
2018

The changing welfare of rural households in the vicinity of large-scale land acquisitions in Tanzania

Emma Aisbett, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU.

Large-scale foreign land acquisitions (LSFLAs) are proving to be one of the most contested aspects of globalization and development.

09
May
2018

2018 aid budget breakfast

Stephen Howes, Director, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School, ANU.

The Aid Budget Breakfast is back for its sixth edition. Professor Stephen Howes, Director of the Development Policy Centre will bring you Devpolicy’s annual Australian aid update. Will there be further cuts? If so, where will they fall?

09
May
2018

The Bank of Japan's Exchange Traded Funds purchase and its effects on Nikkei 225 stocks

Kimie Harada, Visiting Fellow, Crawford School of Public Policy.

After extensive experience in Japanese government committees and research into financial systems and services, Kimie Harada will present her findings on the impacts of the Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) purchasing program.

09
May
2018

Can formalisation of adat law protect community rights?

Professor Kathryn Robinson, Department of Anthropology, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, ANU.

Claims against the widespread dispossession of village lands, which were very common under the New Order, continue to emerge in connection with land extensive investment projects, including infrastructure.

10
May
2018

Activating systems change - methodological foundations and opportunities

Professor Claudia Pahl-Wostl, Director of the Institute for Environmental Systems Research; and Assistant Professor Datu Buyung Agusdinata, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability.

PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT HAS NOW BEEN CANCELLED.

This breakfast event is presented by ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and UNSW Canberra Public Service Research Group.

10
May
2018

Navigating the emerging world order - Sydney

Associate Professor Michael Clarke and Dr Michael Cohen

The security landscape is changing rapidly. Challenges to the US-led security order are advancing faster than anticipated.

10
May
2018

Universal Values and Chinese Characteristics: A Perspective through the Revival of Confucianism in China Today

Hoyt Tillman
The interactions and tensions between Western and Chinese ideas and values have a long and complex history. In recent years, however, hostility in China to Western claims about “universal values” has become so intense that they now lead the list of topics that should not be discussed in China. This paper will explore the issue through the lens of the contemporary revival of Confucianism. It will focus on the recent promotion of the universal significance of Zhu Xi’s Family Instructions. What might we learn about the struggle over universal values by surveying the claims of Contemporary Confucians in China?
10
May
2018

Transforming Australia into an outward looking economy: why the 1940s matters

David Vines, University of Oxford.

In this talk Professor Vines will describe the radical shift in thinking by the generation of economists who worked in Canberra during and immediately after World War II, including Nugget Coombs, John Crawford, Lyndhurst Giblin, Leslie Melville, and, e

11
May
2018

Testing the Dutch disease: the impact of natural resources extraction on the manufacturing sector

Donny Pasaribu, PhD Scholar, Crawford School, ANU.

Empirical evidence of the Dutch disease in manufacturing has been mixed and inconclusive. This research tests Dutch disease theory by measuring the impact of natural resource rents on manufacturing value added.

11
May
2018

Testing the Dutch disease: the impact of natural resources extraction on the manufacturing sector

Donny Pasaribu, PhD Scholar, Crawford School, ANU.

Empirical evidence of the Dutch disease in manufacturing has been mixed and inconclusive. This research tests Dutch disease theory by measuring the impact of natural resource rents on manufacturing value added.

11
May
2018

Historic summit and beyond: inter-Korea summit and strategic partnership

H.E. Mr Lee Baeksoon, Ambassador of the Republic of Korea to Australia.

11
May
2018

Navigating the emerging world order - Brisbane

Professor Rory Medcalf and Associate Professor Matthew Sussex

The security landscape is changing rapidly. Challenges to the US-led security order are advancing faster than anticipated.

14
May
2018

Thai Taster Class

Chintana Sandilands

Thai is the national and official language of Thailand and spoken by about 60 million people. The study of Thai is essential for anyone wishing to understand Thailand's culture, society and long history.

15
May
2018

Post budget policy forum: Tell us what you really think!

Steve Sedgwick AO, Jane Halton AO PSM, Professor Helen Sullivan, Dr John Hewson AM,Phil Coorey
Tell us what you really think: what does the 2018-19 budget mean for Australia next year and for our longer term trajectory?
15
May
2018

Carbon offsets in the clean development mechanism

Dr Leslie Martin, Department of Economics, University of Melbourne.

This paper evaluates the extent to which carbon offsets in the international emissions trading market represent true emission reductions.

15
May
2018

Film Screening: Aliko and Ambai

Theresa Meki, Assistant Producer, Aliko and Ambai, and PhD Candidate, ANU.

Aliko and Ambai is a new feature film from Papua New Guinea that takes its audience into the world of two young women navigating the hurdles of poverty, violence, forced marriage and abuse as they endeavour to build a future for themselves.

16
May
2018

Paid parental leave: What can the United States and Australia learn from each other?

Professor Deborah Widiss, Maurer School of Law, Indiana University.

The Social Policy Institute at the Crawford School of the ANU runs a series of workshops exploring major social policy concerns.

17
May
2018

On the ground in the Taiwan Sunflower and Hong Kong Umbrella Movements

Ian Rowen
In 2014, Taiwan and Hong Kong witnessed the largest episodes of political contention in their histories. Both the Sunflower Movement and the Umbrella Movement were propelled by youth activists, accelerated in unpredictable ways, and received names not of their choosing. Yet their outcomes were very different. Based on first-hand participant-observation, this talk will compare and contrast the emergence and outcomes of both of these protests. Rather than provide a simple verdict on the two movements, it will explore how activists and state officials have themselves socially constructed notions of “success” and “failure” for these complex and unfinished struggles.
18
May
2018

Tariff liberalisation in Myanmar: an intertemporal CGE analysis

Sun Htoo Aung, PhD Scholar, Crawford School, ANU.

Since 2011, Myanmar’s government has launched a series of economic reforms including partial liberalisation of international trade and finance.

19
May
2018

Metal Politics: From Stage to Congress

Freddy Tshiong-tso Lim
Freddy Tshiong-tso Lim 林昶佐, the lead vocalist of Taiwanese metal band Chthonic and a Member of the Legislative Yuan, will share how his experience as a human rights activist and politician has influenced his music. He will address his vision and mission for the future of the relationship between China and Taiwan, and discuss how the national identity of Taiwan's younger generation should be understood.
21
May
2018

Malaysia’s GE14 and aftermath: dawn of a new era?

Professor Bridget Welsh, John Cabot University
Bridget Welsh discusses the political terrain in a new Harapan government, with attention to the GE14 results and the new political groups and priorities emerging.
21
May
2018

Governing change: Myanmar’s executive policymaking in transition (2011-2018)

Dr Su Mon Thazin Aung, Institute for Strategy and Policy Myanmar
This seminar addresses the research question: how has policymaking taken place in Myanmar’s transitional governments after the end of the military junta as the ‘central policymaking device’?
21
May
2018

Understanding Myanmar today: launch of Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Myanmar

Dr Nicholas Farrelly, Dr Charlotte Galloway, Dr Su Mon Thazin Aung, Gerard McCarthy, and Dr Jacqueline Menager. Discussant comments by Professor Michael Wesley
After decades of mismanagement and direct military rule, Myanmar’s contested transition to a more democratic government has rapidly shifted the outlook in this significant Southeast Asian nation.
21
May
2018

Mandarin Taster Class

Dr Fengyuan Ji

Mandarin, or Modern Chinese, is the official language of China and one of the world's major languages. As Australia's future is increasingly tied to the rise of China as a world power, the importance of Mandarin will continue to grow.

21
May
2018

Mapping our future: towards an Indo-Pacific strategy for Australia

Professor Rory Medcalf, Head of National Security College, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU.

This event is fully booked but will be livestreamed here

22
May
2018

Hirashasan: Ruling diamonds in the realm of Gonds – Adda Seminar

Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt, Environment and Development Program, Crawford School of Public Policy

District administration of Panna in Madhya Pradesh state in India use the term Hirashasan for the rules that govern the mining and trade of diamonds.

22
May
2018

Would Australians be more supportive of redistribution if they knew what level of inequality existed?

Christopher Hoy, PhD Candidate in Economics, Crawford School of Public Policy

Previous studies have shown that Australians tend to dramatically underestimate the level of national inequality and tend to believe they are around the middle of the income distribution regardless of whether they are rich or poor.

22
May
2018

Re-imagining the Rule of Law

Martin Krygier

The rule of law is a concept at once too important to ignore, and too confused and confusing to guide. It needs and deserves re-imagining.

22
May
2018

The economic and political causes of Indonesia’s forest fires

Russell Toth, The University of Sydney.

Annual forest fires raise substantial health, environmental and economic costs for Indonesia and its neighbours.

22
May
2018

Tax challenges arising from digitalisation: an international perspective

David Bradbury, Head of the Tax Policy and Statistics Division of the Centre for Tax Policy and Administration, OECD

As the Head of Tax Policy at the OECD, David Bradbury led the team that recently delivered the

23
May
2018

Dangers to democracy in India?

Prof Katharine Adeney, University of Nottingham

India is often cited as being the world’s largest democracy.

23
May
2018

Japanese Taster Class

Dr Shunichi Ishihara

*Please note this event will be held in BPB W1.17 (not W1.21 where previous taster classes have been held)*

24
May
2018

The songs of belonging: genealogy, community, livelihood and resistance

Mukesh Kumar, University of Technology Sydney
This presentation analyses the past and present forms of religious synthesis and separation among them arguing the socio-economic status of a group not only structures a kind of power and domination including the awareness of a collective self in a caste society but also it helps in shaping a new identity.
24
May
2018

Postgraduate information evening

Cecily Stewart, Manager, National Recruitment and Development, Crawford School of Public Policy.

Looking to enhance or build your public policy career? Explore your Crawford School study options at our Postgraduate Information Evening.

25
May
2018

Philippines Update 2018: Contesting the Philippines

Secretary Benjamin E. Diokno, Secretary, Department of Budget and Management, Philippines

About the Philippines Update

25
May
2018

Dancing across the disciplinary silos

Ryan Wong and Deb Cleland

Interdisciplinarity is a practice - it takes practice. At the AMICIE forum, we invite you to co-design an interdisciplinary conference with us. We have fun exercises for practising your interdisciplinary skills.

29
May
2018

Greening the EBRD through its Accountability Mechanism?

Associate Professor Susan Park, University of Sydney

Emerging from the rubble of the Cold War, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) was, until 2016, the newest of the big Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs).

29
May
2018

The Green Climate Fund, climate finance, and the imperatives and pathways for global transformation

Howard Bamsey, Executive Director, Green Climate Fund and Mr Patrick Suckling, Ambassador for the Environment, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Reaching the ambitions of the Paris Agreement will require global changes towards low-carbon, climate-resilient economies.

30
May
2018

PNG aid evaluation forum: drought, roads and health

Various speakers

PNG is Australia’s largest aid recipient, receiving over $500 million a year in development assistance.

30
May
2018

Who really are the poor? Measuring poverty with multiple dimensions

Putu Geniki Lavinia Natih, PhD Candidate at Oxford University.

The trend in poverty is a litmus test of the social quality of economic systems; a poverty measure provides a basis to evaluate the effectiveness of welfare policies and acts as a powerful instrument to focus policy makers’ attention on the living cond

30
May
2018

Investing in change: the path to a decarbonised world

Mr Howard Bamsey, Executive Director, Green Climate Fund, and many more.

Which areas is it fair and reasonable for a university to invest in? What does forward-looking and ethical investment mean for an organisation like ANU?

30
May
2018

Removing reform roadblocks: do we need a hero, a window, more willpower - or something else?

This year is the 30th anniversary of the introduction of the Higher Education Contribution Scheme (HECS) which removed the right to free university education.
30
May
2018

paradigm_shift: people movement

The politics of people movement is a defining feature of the 21st century, with profound ramifications for every country in the Asia Pacific region, including Australia.

31
May
2018

Country Roads: China's Economic Statecraft Across Asia and Europe

James Reilly
Drawing upon my current book manuscript, this talk will explore how Chinese leaders' dependence upon economic agencies, state-owned enterprises and local officials shapes both the strategies and effectiveness of China's economic statecraft. Drawing upon years of field research across mainland Asia and Europe, this presentation will spotlight key findings from my comparative case studies on North Korea and Myanmar, as well as from across Eastern and Western Europe.
31
May
2018

Film screening: We Don't Need a Map

The Southern Cross is the most famous constellation in the Southern Hemisphere. Ever since colonisation it has been claimed, appropriated and hotly-contested for ownership by a radical range of Australian groups.

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Updated:  24 April, 2017/Responsible Officer:  Dean, ANU College of Asia & the Pacific/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team