Asia Pacific Week 2012 - Session 3: The Strategic Consequences of the Changing Power Structure of the Asia-Pacific Region

The Asia-Pacific power structure is in flux, as new powers such as China and India have risen and are challenging US primacy in the region.

When the Cold War ended prominent commentators optimistically proclaimed that the ‘end of history’ had arrived and that international conflict would become obsolete. Yet the Cold War never really ended in the Asia-Pacific. Its legacy is still apparent in the US-led bilateral network of security alliances and the persistence of dangerous flashpoints on the Korean Peninsula and across the Taiwan Strait. Historical tensions have also become more strategically important, including between China and Japan, and India and China. Most significantly, the Asia-Pacific power structure is in flux, as new powers such as China and India have risen and are challenging US primacy in the region. When combined, these factors will have serious consequences for the security of the Asia-Pacific region, and possibly the world. With these issues in mind, this panel of leading experts from the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre will consider the strategic consequences of the changing power structure of the Asia-Pacific region.

ANU Asia Pacific Week will bring leading experts on the Asia Pacific region together with 100 delegates from around the world to engage in a series of dynamic discussions and events focused on developments and trends that will shape the ‘Asia Pacific Century’.


Date: Tuesday, 10 July 2012

SHARE

Updated:  11 January, 2015/Responsible Officer:  Dean, ANU College of Asia & the Pacific/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team