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Authority record

Brown, Gerald F. X.

  • Brown, Gerald F. X.
  • Person
  • 1909-1968

Patrol Officer / Native Labour Inspector

Clingan, Jill

  • Clingan, Jill (1942- )
  • Person
  • 1942-

Jill Clingan was born in Sydney. From an early age Ms. Clingan displayed artistic talent. She won a scholarship to study art at East Sydney Technical College but switched to a career in nursing. For over thirty years she studied and worked in the nursing profession in Sydney, the Western Highlands of Papua New Guinea and in Canberra. She trained in nursing at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney, gaining certificates in General Nursing and Midwifery, nursed at the Royal Canberra Hospital, and gained a further certificate in Infant and Child Health. Miss Clingan then undertook studies at the NSW Baptist Bible College for a Deaconess and Missions Diploma which fired her interest in studying for a degree in Linguistics and Anthropology. She moved to PNG to work as a nurse for the Australian Baptist Mission in the Tinsley Hospital (later Health Centre), on the Baiyer River, 35 miles from Mt Hagen in the Western Highlands, for a two year term, 1971-1973. There she had a little time for sketching and painting and, by selling some of her paintings, was able to travel home via Madang and Lae. Working in Canberra Miss Clingan gained a fourth certificate in Community Nursing. She later travelled extensively in the Indian sub-continent, South East Asia, China, Hungary and Western Europe as well as the Middle East, and developed her artistic skills, publishing her sketches and drawings of the Greek Islands, exhibiting her works and fulfilling commissioned works. Since then she has travelled in Anatolia, Iran and Central Asia, gleaning more ideas for art and broadening further her areas of interest. In 1999 Miss Clingan completed a degree in linguistics and anthropology and commenced an enlargement of her degree work in Anthropology, on the indigenisation of Christianity in the Western Highlands of PNG following a short return visit there in 1999.

Gammage, Bill

  • Gammage, Bill
  • Person
  • 1942-

Bill Gammage was born in 1942. He arrived in Wagga Wagga, NSW, in 1951 after living about 2 years in Orange and about 7 years in Sydney. He went to Wagga Demonstration School and Wagga High School. During his school years, he worked in a range of jobs including a market garden, a cordial factory, and as a farm labourer. From 1961 he was a regular employee of the Heckendorfs of “Mountview”, Lockhart, during the long Christmas holidays, working mainly on the wheat harvest.

In 1961, Bill went to the Australian National University (ANU), Canberra. In 1964, he completed his Teachers’ Certificate at the University of Sydney and in 1965 his honours year in History at the ANU.

In 1966, Bill went to Port Moresby to teach history in the preliminary year of the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG). At the end of the year, he returned to ANU to do his PhD on Australian soldiers in the Great War. With his PhD finished, Bill travelled the world for a year.

On return from his travels in 1971, Bill worked for 5 months as a research assistant for Ken Inglis, Professor of History at UPNG, then accepted a job teaching Australian and Papua New Guinea history in the History Department at UPNG. In February 1972, he and Jan married and went to Port Moresby.

At the end of 1976, Bill left UPNG and joined the History Department at the University of Adelaide, teaching Australian history. From 1987 to 1990, he was Senior Research Fellow in Pacific History at the ANU, and from 1996, he was in the Humanities Research Centre at ANU, where he remains today as Adjunct Professor. He continues to supervise post-graduate students.

Bill’s books include The Broken Years: Australian Soldiers in the Great War (1974), An Australian in the First World War (1976), Narrandera Shire (1986), The Sky Travellers: Journeys in New Guinea 1938-1939 (1998) and The Biggest Estate on Earth: How Aborigines Made Australia (2011). He has written articles, including on Papua New Guinea, and worked as a historical adviser/consultant on films and documentaries. He was a member of the Council of the National Museum of Australia for three years. He contributes to the work of the Australian Dictionary of Biography and the National Library of Australia’s Oral History Unit.

In 1987 Bill was made a Freeman of the Shire of Narrandera, in 1991 he became a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, and in 2005 he was awarded the Order of Australia (AM). Several of his books have won prizes, most recently in 2012 The Biggest Estate on Earth won seven prizes, including the Prime Minister’s Prize for Australian History and the Victorian Prize for Literature.

Latukefu, Rev. Dr Sione

  • Latukefu, Rev. Dr Sione
  • Person
  • 1927-1995

Sione Latukefu as a scholar, Tongan patriot and Christian gentleman. Sione was born at Kolovai on Tongatapu in 1927, where his family were prominent commoners with important traditional responsibilities. His grandfather was a distinguished Tongan poet and his family were closely involved in the sufferings, educational achievements and faithful witness of the Wesleyan mission and afterwards the Free Wesleyan Church of Tonga. After secondary education at Tupou College Sione trained for a teaching career in Tonga and then, with scholarships, at the University of Queensland. He had already been ordained a minister of the Free Wesleyan Church in 1960.

Sione’s autobiographical essay, ‘The making of the first Tongan-born professional historian’, in the book Pacific Islands History, edited by Dr. Brij Lal, glosses over most of his educational advancement. The boy from Kolovai was not meant to aspire to academinc honours. Yet the highest in the land acknowledged his ability. Queen Salote, herself a scholar of traditional matters, recognized Sione’s potential, gave him encouragement and, in her last days, passed on some of her own knowledge to him.
Taking his studies further at the Australian National University, in an era when Phd Degrees were still fairly novel throughout the world, Sione was one of the first Pacific Islanders to obtain one. He was a generous, careful and perceptive historian.

Queen Salote had hoped that Sione would take charge of the Tongan Archives. Her death in 1965 caused him to take a different path. While at ANU he met his beloved life-partner, then Dr Ruth Fink and they were married in Sydney in 1966. Both Ruth and Sione successfully applied for the positions of anthropologist and historian respectively at the new University of Papua New Guinea. At Port Moresby they helped lay the groundwork for future courses and trained a new generation of Papua New Guinean leaders. Sione was also a successful funds raiser and from 1969 to 1988 he was secretary and executive officer of the Te Rangi Hiroa Fund for promoting the study of Pacific history.
After 18 years of dedicated service, by which time Sione was an Associate Professor, they retired for a while to Canberra to live. Sione’s dedication then led him to accept the post of Principal of the Pacific Theological College in Suva which he held from 1989 to 1991 when ill health led to his return to Canberra. At the College he proved a stabilising influence and helped to give the curriculum a greater academic emphasis. In Canberra he contined to work on various research projects surviving a triple by-pass operation and other setbacks with great courage and aplomb. He participated fully in the life of the new Division of Pacific and Asian History and he was still writing articles and working on a book at the time of his death.

Malua Theological College

  • Malua Theological College
  • Corporate body
  • 1844-

Malua Theological College is a training institute for the ministry of the Congregational Christian Church in Samoa (CCCS). It was established in 1844 in a district of Saleimoa west of Apia on the Island of Upolu.
The aim of the College is to provide quality theological education, and to equip student with knowledge and skills necessary for an effective ministry in the Church.

Paton, Frederick James.

  • Paton, Frederick James
  • Person
  • 1867-1941

Reverend Frederick James Paton, the son of the noted Presbyterian missionary John Gibson Paton, was born at Aniwa, New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) on 5 March 1867. After being educated in Australia and serving there for a short time as a Presbyterian minister, Paton returned to the New Hebrides and spent most of the rest of his life as a missionary there. He was particularly associated with Malekula, where he established a mission station in 1895. Paton worked alongside his wife Helen (died 1905) and second wife Christine (died 1914). He also served as a chaplain to Australian forces during World War I. Frederick Paton died on 12 December 1941.

Speer, Albert, MBE

  • Speer, Albert
  • Person
  • 23 March 1922 - 16 April 2014

Albert Speer was born in 1922 in Goulburn, Australia, and served in New Guinea with 2/2 Australian Field Ambulance from 1942-1945. He served in the Department of Public Health in the Australian Administration of Papua and New Guinea from 1947 until his retirement in 1971, initially as a European Medical Assistant and eventually as acting Director of the Medical Training Division. During the period 1954 to 1957 he was active in exploratory patrols establishing health services in uncontacted and uncontrolled highland areas of Papua. Mr Speer also fostered Sir Albert Maori Kiki, among other children. Mr Speer died in Sydney on 16th April 2014.

Tonkin, Lida, Sr

  • Sr. Lida Tonkin
  • Person
  • unknown

Sister Lida Tonkin (Mrs L. Gill), a nursing sister from Young, NSW, first arrived at the Methodist Mission at Raluana in New Britain in 1916.

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