Regarding Rights

Academic and activist perspectives on human rights


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The right to birth registration in Tanzania

By Summer Wood,

New York University

Tanzania registration agency sign

Tanzania registration agency sign

Having a birth certificate is a basic human right, established by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (art. 15), the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (art. 24), and the Convention on the Rights of the Child (art. 7). A birth certificate is regarded as the ‘first human right’ and can provide a gateway to the realization of many other civil, political, economic, and social rights for children, including access to health and education services, and protection from human rights violations such as child labor, child marriage, trafficking, and criminal prosecution as an adult.

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CIGJ News & Events

Stephan Parmentier

Stephan Parmentier

We have had a lively few weeks at the Centre, with some of our favourite regular visitors returning and engaging our intellectual community with their usual generosity of spirit and clarity of insight. Professor Stephen Parmentier, of K.U. Leuven (Belgium), opened a workshop on ‘Current issues in transitional justice’ with a wonderful survey of the field, its origins, and his perception of priorities for future research. Continue Reading →


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Federalism, Political Will, and Canada’s Commitment to International Human Rights: A Historical Perspective

Image from National Union of Public and General Employees, Canada.  http://nupge.ca/content/%5Bnid%5D/canadas-sham-response-un-human-rights-review

Image from National Union of Public and General Employees, Canada.
http://tinyurl.com/m8eoo7y

Jennifer Tunnicliffe
McMaster University

In April 2013, the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) conducted its second evaluation of Canada’s human rights progress under the Universal Periodic Review (UPR). The final report, which takes the form of recommendations from member states of the UNHRC, identified a number of concerns, including: the lack of a national action plan to reduce high levels of poverty; excessive use of force by police against citizens in marginalized communities; a failure to uphold the basic rights of Indigenous peoples; gender inequality; and violence against women and children, Indigenous women and girls in particular.

Central to the UPR report is a broad sense that Canada is failing to fully implement its international human rights commitments. Continue Reading →