Regarding Rights

Academic and activist perspectives on human rights


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Drifting Sovereignty

By Marie-Eve Loiselle

Centre for International Governance and Justice

Sea Monsters by Dennis Kim http://tinyurl.com/nuanaq8

Sea Monsters by Dennis Kim
http://tinyurl.com/nuanaq8

Berkeley Professor of Political Science Wendy Brown’s latest book Walled States, Waning Sovereignty would make an interesting bedside read for Australian Immigration and Border Protection Minister Scott Morrison.

On the 7th of May, Minister Morrison unveiled the Australian Government’s new border policy during an address to the Lowy Institute for International Policy. The creation of the Australian Border Force (ABF) will see the merging of immigration and customs into a single portfolio. It will be headed by a Commissioner holding the same status as other security agency chiefs, including the Commissioner of the Australian Federal Police, the Chief of the Defence Force, and the Director General of the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO). Continue Reading →


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Centre for International Governance and Justice: News and Events

Jonathan Kent

Welcome Jonathan Kent!

A PhD scholar in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto, Jonathan Kent will be visiting the Centre until early August. Jonathan’s research considers the regional response to irregular migration in the Asia Pacific, and asks how and why regional cooperation has emerged, and how norms surrounding the regulation of irregular migration have evolved.


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Smoking bans in Australian Prisons

By Anita Mackay, Monash University

Elephant and Castle - No Smoking

States and Territories around Australia are rushing to ban smoking in prisons – the Northern Territory was the first in July 2013, and has recently been joined by Queensland (from 5 May 2014).  Most others have stated their intention to ban smoking during 2015.[1]  This blog post poses two questions:

1. What are smoking bans in prisons intended to achieve? and

2. Based on overseas experience, are smoking bans an effective way to achieve these objectives?

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Centre for International Governance and Justice: News and Events

Peace Palace, The HagueInternational Court of Justice hands down its decision in the Whaling in the Antarctic Case

The ICJ, with CIGJ Director Professor Hilary Charlesworth acting as judge ad hoc, handed down the decision on 31 March. The judgment can be read here. The American Society of International Law has also recently published a commentary on the case, which is available here.


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What can human rights treaties do for people? The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Mongolia

Image from the Facebook page of the Mongolian DPO Bid Chadna ("We Can")

Image from the Facebook page of the Mongolian DPO Bid Chadna (“We Can”)

By Nara Ganbat

Centre for International Governance and Justice

On a very cold evening on 13 December 2006, I was on my way back home from a women’s prison located just outside of Ulaanbaatar, where two of us from the Mongolian Human Rights Commission had spent a whole day conducting an inquiry. Suddenly my mobile phone rang and I heard a very excited voice saying ‘Congratulations! Our Convention has just been adopted by the United Nations!’ Along with excitement, I was also able to hear expectations – an expectation, first of all, that the newly adopted Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) will bring change to the thousands of people with disabilities in Mongolia,[1] who are amongst the most vulnerable in our society.[2] Continue Reading →