Regarding Rights

Academic and activist perspectives on human rights


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Centre for International Governance and Justice: News and Events

Vicky MasonWe are looking forward to welcoming Victoria Mason to the CIGJ next week. Victoria is a Lecturer in Human Rights and Peace and Conflict Studies in ANU’s School of Politics and International Relations, and will be a visitor at the Centre until 31st January 2016.

Victoria’s current projects include work on conflict and conflict resolution in the Middle East (particularly Israel-Palestine and Iraq), the Palestinian question and broader human rights and gender issues in the Middle East. Her wider human rights research includes projects on state violence and state terror, the treatment of refugees, and issues of Islamophobia and anti-Arab discrimination in the West.

Emma Larking was on radio 3CR program, ‘Radical Philosophy’ recently, discussing human rights and Hannah Arendt’s concept of a ‘right to have rights’ with host Beth Matthews.

Listen to the program here.


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Two Approaches to Human Rights Review in Post-War Sri Lanka

U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay listens to an ethnic Tamil war survivor during her visit to Mullivaikkal, Sri Lanka. Source: The Hindu, 9 Sept 2013.

U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay listens to an ethnic Tamil war survivor during her visit to Mullivaikkal, Sri Lanka. Source: The Hindu, 9 Sept 2013.

By Jacinta Mulders, Centre for International Governance and Justice, ANU

Some have lauded the Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR) mechanism for its state-based model, ensuring equality of treatment between all 193 UN member states. Others have criticised the bureaucratic nature of the process and the superficiality of the documents produced. Continue Reading →


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Centre for International Governance and Justice: News and Events

Welcome Catherine O’Rourke! Catherine is Senior Lecturer in Human Rights and International Law, and Gender Research Coordinator at the University of Ulster’s Transitional Justice Institute (TJI). Her current research projects consider the perceived costs and benefits of feminist engagement with international law. One case study considers local, transnational and ‘insider’ campaigns for the implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 in Northern Ireland. A second case study is concerned with local alliances between human rights and feminist organisations in engaging the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women to advance women’s reproductive rights in Northern Ireland.

Catherine arrived at the CIGJ last Monday and graciously stepped into a free seminar slot to discuss a fascinating development in international criminal law. Recently, the TJI was commissioned by the International Criminal Court’s Trust Fund for Victims to hold a consultation on the implementation of the reparations order in the Lubanga case. Catherine described some of the complex issues that emerged at the consultation and the dilemmas that remain.

Catherine will also present a seminar this coming Tuesday: ‘Feminist strategy in International Law: a conceptual and empirical framework.’

Torture After 9.11: The Asia Pacific Context

CIGJ fellow, Cynthia Banham, is convening a workshop on ‘Torture After 9.11: The Asia Pacific Context. The workshop, to be held at ANU in November, will examine the current state of the norm against torture with particular emphasis on understandings and practices around torture in the Asia-Pacific region. The keynote address will be delivered by Professor Stephen Toope, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. A call for papers has just been circulated.


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The Impunity Dilemma: Sexual Offences by UN Peacekeepers

A Ghanaian peacekeeper serving with the United Nations Mission in Liberia, on guard duty during a visit by the Special Representative Karin Landgren, in Cestos City, Liberia, Friday 16, November, 2012. UNMIL Photo/Staton Winter

A Ghanaian peacekeeper serving with the United Nations Mission in Liberia, on guard duty during a visit by the Special Representative Karin Landgren, in Cestos City, Liberia, Friday 16, November, 2012.
UNMIL Photo/Staton Winter

By Róisín Burke

Irish Centre for Human Rights, National University of Ireland Galway

In recent months several leaked UN reports revealed that sexual offences by peacekeepers, UN and others, is rampant. This is not a new phenomenon. Sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers has been a significant problem for the UN since at least the 1990s. Incidents have included alleged and proven cases of rape, gang rape, pedophilia, prostitution, and other forms of sexual exploitation and abuse across numerous UN operations.[1] Continue Reading →