Regarding Rights

Academic and activist perspectives on human rights


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Centre for International Governance and Justice: News and Events

The past week has seen a number of presentations by visitors to the CIGJ. On Wednesday afternoon, Professor Ann Orford of the University of Melbourne Law School gave a fascinating masterclass on critical theory and legal scholarship, in which she explored the contested relationship between the critical scholar, the production of knowledge, and the object of that knowledge.

This was followed on Thursday morning by CIGJ Visiting Scholar Siobhán Airey, who presented “Sovereignty’s sanctimony in ODA – a Jar’Edo Wens or Janus in international law?”. Siobhan’s talk examined Official Development Assistance (ODA) as an instrument of global governance through the insights of Foucault and Carl Schmitt, and analysed the tensions between ideas of sovereignty and the disciplinary decision-making practices of ODA donors.

Finally, on Friday Yaprak Yildiz presented “Avowal and disavowal of state violence: confessional performances of perpetrators.” In this seminar, Yaprak spoke of her research on truth-telling in reconciliation processes. She considered cases of confessions by Turkish state officials for atrocities committed against the Kurdish population.

We also want to alert Regarding Rights readers to this recent article on the Conversation by RR contributor, Fiona McGaughey, writing on her observations of Australia’s appearance this month before the Universal Periodic Review.


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Political Participation: Where are Women with Disabilities?

Image from Wheels for Humanity Indonesia http://ucpruk.org

Image from Wheels for Humanity Indonesia
http://ucpruk.org

By Jane Connors

We celebrated 70 years of the United Nations (UN) on 24 October, with landmarks all over the world, including Uluru, controversially, turning UN blue in commemoration.

The few human rights provisions of the UN Charter form the basis of international legal standards, established in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and institutions for the promotion and protection of the human rights of women. In 1952, the UN adopted the Convention on the Political Rights of Women. It adopted the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, obliging States parties to eliminate discrimination against women in all fields, including public and political life, in 1979. Negotiation of these instruments was contentious: States expressed reservations on many provisions on adoption, which they confirmed on ratification or accession. Continue Reading →


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Centre for International Governance and Justice: News and Events

Human rights without humanism

Foucault and the Politics of RightsIs it possible to be a human rights advocate if you don’t believe in humanity? Read Ben Golder’s musings on human rights without humanism, and how Foucault (skivvy clad but unencumbered by morals) horrified Chomsky in the 1970s, but came to endorse ‘the twentieth century’s master moral universalist discourse: human rights’, in this Stanford University Press blog. And then read the introduction to Ben’s recently released book, Foucault and the Politics of Rights. Congratulations on the release Ben!

New scholarship in human rights and social justice

CIGJ Artwork copyExpressions of interest are invited for a new three year full time PhD scholarship at the CIGJ in human rights and social justice. Thesis proposals dealing with the implementation of international human rights standards at local, regional or international levels are particularly welcome.

For further information or to discuss the role of PhD scholar, contact CIGJ Director, Professor Hilary Charlesworth: hilary.charlesworth@anu.edu.au. Applicants are encouraged to contact Hilary to discuss their proposal before submitting an expression of interest. More information on the scholarship is available here.