Regarding Rights

Academic and activist perspectives on human rights


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Women as Humans: Human Rights, Feminisms, and Rethinking the Human

By Amber Karanikolas

Image: flickr/BWSS

Image: flickr/BWSS

To come up against what functions, for some, as a limit case of the human is a challenge to rethink the human. And the task to rethink the human is part of the democratic trajectory of evolving human rights jurisprudence.[1]

Who is the subject of human rights? Or, to put the question another way, who has the right to be human? Do women? The concept of human rights is continually evolving, and it is used in diverse ways. Human rights can encompass the many forms of ‘rights-talk’ that social movements use to make their claims, and internationally, recognition of human rights is proliferating. Although not denoting global compliance with human rights norms, it is now commonplace to declare that we live in an age of human rights.

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Centre for International Governance and Justice: News and Events

Brasil, 2015 © Ana Guzzo | Flickr (publicseminar.org)

Brasil, 2015 © Ana Guzzo | Flickr (publicseminar.org)

Political gymnastics in Turkey and Brazil

In Turkey, President Erdoğan is using a coup d’état as a pretext to suspend the rule of law, entrench his authoritarian government, and lock up dissidents in their thousands. According to a report in The Guardian, more than 2,700 judges and prosecutors, and 20,000 teachers and administrators have been suspended from their jobs and a work travel ban imposed on academics.

Meanwhile, Regarding Rights contributor and former CIGJ Visiting PhD scholar, Mariana Prandini Assis has argued – in a post for publicseminar.org co-authored with Pablo Holmes – that the ouster of Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff, although conducted under the guise of legality, was in effect a coup d’état.

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Law and Emancipation

By Hilary Charlesworth,

Centre for International Governance and Justice

Hilary Louvain

On 21st April, CIGJ Director Hilary Charlesworth was awarded a Doctorate Honoris Causa by the Faculty of Law and Criminology at the Catholic University of Louvain. With Professors Michael Grimaldi from the Université Panthéon-Assas (Paris II) and Jonathan Simon from the University of California, Berkeley, Hilary was honoured in a ceremony based on the theme, ‘Law and Emancipation’. This is the address given by Hilary at the conferral ceremony:

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After Conflict: Memory Frictions in Timor-Leste and Aceh – Part II

By Lia Kent, Centre for International Governance and Justice, ANU 

Nicolau Lobato statue, Dili airport

Nicolau Lobato statue, Dili airport

In this post, RegNet and CIGJ Fellow Lia Kent discusses themes emerging from her preliminary fieldwork in Timor-Leste and Aceh. In a previous post, Lia introduced the research project she is currently working on and its theoretical framework. Both posts are based on a seminar that Lia gave at RegNet on 24 May 2016.[i]

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