Regarding Rights

Academic and activist perspectives on human rights


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Political Participation: Where are Women with Disabilities?

Image from Wheels for Humanity Indonesia http://ucpruk.org

Image from Wheels for Humanity Indonesia
http://ucpruk.org

By Jane Connors

We celebrated 70 years of the United Nations (UN) on 24 October, with landmarks all over the world, including Uluru, controversially, turning UN blue in commemoration.

The few human rights provisions of the UN Charter form the basis of international legal standards, established in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and institutions for the promotion and protection of the human rights of women. In 1952, the UN adopted the Convention on the Political Rights of Women. It adopted the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, obliging States parties to eliminate discrimination against women in all fields, including public and political life, in 1979. Negotiation of these instruments was contentious: States expressed reservations on many provisions on adoption, which they confirmed on ratification or accession. Continue Reading →


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What can human rights treaties do for people? The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Mongolia

Image from the Facebook page of the Mongolian DPO Bid Chadna ("We Can")

Image from the Facebook page of the Mongolian DPO Bid Chadna (“We Can”)

By Nara Ganbat

Centre for International Governance and Justice

On a very cold evening on 13 December 2006, I was on my way back home from a women’s prison located just outside of Ulaanbaatar, where two of us from the Mongolian Human Rights Commission had spent a whole day conducting an inquiry. Suddenly my mobile phone rang and I heard a very excited voice saying ‘Congratulations! Our Convention has just been adopted by the United Nations!’ Along with excitement, I was also able to hear expectations – an expectation, first of all, that the newly adopted Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) will bring change to the thousands of people with disabilities in Mongolia,[1] who are amongst the most vulnerable in our society.[2] Continue Reading →