Regarding Rights

Academic and activist perspectives on human rights


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Law as a site of politics: an interview with Hilary Charlesworth

By Mareike Riedel

Centre for International Governance and Justice, RegNet, ANU

Hilary-Charlesworth

This interview with CIGJ Director, Hilary Charlesworth, appeared first on Völkerrechtsblog.

Hilary Charlesworth is best known for her work on feminist theory and international law, however her intellectual curiosity extends far beyond this – for example she recently explored the role of rituals and ritualism in human rights monitoring and in 2011 she was appointed judge ad hoc of the International Court of Justice for the Whaling in the Antarctic case. In 2015 Völkerrechtsblog had the pleasure to meet with Hilary Charlesworth in her sunny Canberra office and talk with her about the old and new boundaries of international law and what feminism in international institutions has in common with space food.

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Rights, Regulation and Bodily Integrity: Reflections from Sport

By Kate Henne, RegNet, ANU

Dutee Chand was banned from competition in 2014 (Photo: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)

Dutee Chand was banned from competition in 2014 (Photo: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)

Sport is a space in which the policing and scrutiny of athletes’ bodies is explicit. Regular commentaries about athletes’ physical performances, suspected performance-enhancing drug use and changes to their bodies’ shape or size offer everyday examples. Accordingly, sport is a site that enables us to think through the tensions between rights, regulation and bodily integrity. Recent developments around the regulation of who can participate in women’s sports events offer a timely and important case in point.

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Women in the rulings of the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights: Moving beyond the single story

By Mariana Prandini Assis, The New School for Social Research (New York)**

BILLIE ZANGEWA, The Rebirth of the Black Venus, 2010*   https://www.artsy.net/artist/billie-zangewa

BILLIE ZANGEWA, The Rebirth of the Black Venus, 2010*
https://www.artsy.net/artist/billie-zangewa

After a long battle with the mainstream of human rights discourse and institutions dating from at least the era of the League of Nations, feminists organized in a transnational movement[1] have succeeded in placing women’s issues at the centre of human rights debates.

Here I want to take a step back from celebrating these achievements and ask: if women are now part of the transnational discourse on human rights, who are these women? How do transnational human rights institutions represent them? Or, put in other words, who is the female subject of transnational legal discourse and what gendered harms are made visible in this arena?

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Looking Back on Feminist Approaches to International Law

Recently, the blog IntLawGrrls featured a month-long series on the 1991 AJIL article ‘Feminist Approaches to International Law’, by co-authors Hilary Charlesworth, Christine Chinkin, and Shelley Wright. Here Hilary, Christine and Shelley conclude the series by reflecting on their article and its impact. View the original article here, and the IntLawGrrls series here. We would like to thank the editors of IntLawGrrls for allowing us to post ‘Looking Back on Feminist Approaches to International Law’ on Regarding Rights .

We are so grateful to Jaya Ramji-Nogales for organizing this IntLawGrrls series, to Jaya and our colleagues Sari Kouvo, Aoife O’Donoghue, Fiona de Londras, Siobhán Mullally, Doris Buss, Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, and Diane Marie Amann for their generous posts, and to the readers who commented on those posts. It has been heartening to read the responses to our article and to see different ways of understanding it.

Our article, ‘Feminist Approaches to International Law’, came to life in a haphazard way. Continue Reading →