Regarding Rights

Academic and activist perspectives on human rights


Leave a comment

Law as a site of politics: an interview with Hilary Charlesworth

By Mareike Riedel

Centre for International Governance and Justice, RegNet, ANU

Hilary-Charlesworth

This interview with CIGJ Director, Hilary Charlesworth, appeared first on Völkerrechtsblog.

Hilary Charlesworth is best known for her work on feminist theory and international law, however her intellectual curiosity extends far beyond this – for example she recently explored the role of rituals and ritualism in human rights monitoring and in 2011 she was appointed judge ad hoc of the International Court of Justice for the Whaling in the Antarctic case. In 2015 Völkerrechtsblog had the pleasure to meet with Hilary Charlesworth in her sunny Canberra office and talk with her about the old and new boundaries of international law and what feminism in international institutions has in common with space food.

Continue Reading →


Leave a comment

Two Approaches to Human Rights Review in Post-War Sri Lanka

U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay listens to an ethnic Tamil war survivor during her visit to Mullivaikkal, Sri Lanka. Source: The Hindu, 9 Sept 2013.

U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay listens to an ethnic Tamil war survivor during her visit to Mullivaikkal, Sri Lanka. Source: The Hindu, 9 Sept 2013.

By Jacinta Mulders, Centre for International Governance and Justice, ANU

Some have lauded the Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR) mechanism for its state-based model, ensuring equality of treatment between all 193 UN member states. Others have criticised the bureaucratic nature of the process and the superficiality of the documents produced. Continue Reading →


Leave a comment

Federalism, Political Will, and Canada’s Commitment to International Human Rights: A Historical Perspective

Image from National Union of Public and General Employees, Canada.  http://nupge.ca/content/%5Bnid%5D/canadas-sham-response-un-human-rights-review

Image from National Union of Public and General Employees, Canada.
http://tinyurl.com/m8eoo7y

Jennifer Tunnicliffe
McMaster University

In April 2013, the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) conducted its second evaluation of Canada’s human rights progress under the Universal Periodic Review (UPR). The final report, which takes the form of recommendations from member states of the UNHRC, identified a number of concerns, including: the lack of a national action plan to reduce high levels of poverty; excessive use of force by police against citizens in marginalized communities; a failure to uphold the basic rights of Indigenous peoples; gender inequality; and violence against women and children, Indigenous women and girls in particular.

Central to the UPR report is a broad sense that Canada is failing to fully implement its international human rights commitments. Continue Reading →