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Whaling logbooks, and other documents, copied in New England (USA) repositories

  • AU PMB MS 202
  • Collectie
  • 1809 - 1833

Please refer to the full entry in PMB 200

For indexes see American Whalers and Traders in the Pacific, Robert Langdon, ed., Canberra, 1978 and Where the Whalers Went, Robert Langdon, ed., Canberra, 1984. Information is provided in the following format: Name of ship (in upper case); Name of Captain/Logkeeper; Date of voyage; Area or places visited. HAMILTON; Martain; n.d.; NW Coast USA, Hawaii, Canton HAMILTON; Martain; 1815-; NW Coast USA HAMILTON; Martain; 1809-, 1815-16; NW Coast USA, Hawaii HUNTER; Pinel; 1809-; East Indies, China JANUS; ?; 1815-16; East Indies, Philippines CAMEL; Breech; 1815; Sumatra INDUS; Forbes; 1815-17; Marquesas, Marianas, Hawaii, Far East (VARIOUS); Haskell; 1820-33; Hawaii, Far East CAMEL; Bright; 1816-18; Sumatra

New England Microfilming Project

Marquesas collection

  • AU PMB MS 1170
  • Collectie
  • 1831-1834, 1853-1918

In June 1853 two ordained Hawaiian ministers, Rev. James K. Kekela and Rev. Samuel Kauwealoha, and their wives, and two deacons and their wives, were chosen by the Hawaiian Missionary Board to sail on the English brigantine, Royalist, for the Marquesas Islands located 2,300 miles to the southeast. Accompanied by New England missionary Benjamin Parker of Kaneohe Mission Station, these native couples were the first Hawaiian families to serve as missionaries in the Marquesas, 1853-1909. Supported entirely by the Hawaiian churches and the Hawaiian Evangelical Association, the deputation of native Hawaiian missionaries was predicted to succeed where non-Polynesian missionaries had failed. Although support was strong at first, it diminished over time, and in 1909, with no hope of fresh reinforcements, the last surviving Hawaiian missionaries yielded their efforts to French Protestants from Tahiti.<P>

Also included in this collection is one folder of documents pertaining to an earlier mission to the Washington Islands (Marquesas), 1831-1834. A preliminary visit to explore the islands was made by Messrs. Whitney, Tinker and Alexander of the Sandwich Islands mission in 1832. A favourable report led to the departure in July 1833 of American Protestant missionaries Richard Armstrong, W. P. Alexander and Benjamin W. Parker and their wives to establish a mission in the Marquesas. Their labours proved unsuccessful, however, and the mission was aborted. They returned to the Sandwich Islands the following year to resume their missionary work.

The Marquesas Collection, 1831-1834, 1853-1918, consists of 2.5 linear feet of manuscript material, including personal letters, formal reports of general meetings and mission station reports. Correspondence by native Hawaiian missionaries to the Hawaiian Evangelical Association in Honolulu is in the Hawaiian language. A portion of this correspondence was translated into English in the 1930s by Rev. Henry Pratt Judd, a member of the Hawaiian Board of Missions and the grandson of American Protestant missionary, Gerrit P. Judd. Microfilm copies of these translations can be found at PMB 1171. See Finding aids for details.

Hawaiian Mission Children’s Society

Marquesas collection. English translations of selected Hawaiian language documents.

  • AU PMB MS 1171
  • Collectie
  • 1831-1834, 1853-1918

In June 1853 two ordained Hawaiian ministers, Rev. James K. Kekela and Rev. Samuel Kauwealoha, and their wives, and two deacons and their wives, were chosen by the Hawaiian Missionary Board to sail on the English brigantine, Royalist, for the Marquesas Islands located 2,300 miles to the southeast. Accompanied by New England missionary Benjamin Parker of Kaneohe Mission Station, these native couples were the first Hawaiian families to serve as missionaries in the Marquesas, 1853-1909. Supportedentirely by the Hawaiian churches and the Hawaiian Evangelical Association, the deputation of native Hawaiian missionaries was predicted to succeed where non-Polynesian missionaries had failed. Although support was strong at first, it diminished over time, and in 1909, with no hope of fresh reinforcements, the last surviving Hawaiian missionaries yielded their efforts
to French Protestants from Tahiti.<P>
Also included in this collection is one folder of documents pertaining to an
earlier mission to the Washington Islands (Marquesas), 1831-1834. A preliminary visit to explore the islands was made by Messrs. Whitney, Tinker and Alexander of the Sandwich Islands mission in 1832. A favourable report led to the departure in July 1833 of American Protestant missionaries Richard Armstrong, W. P. Alexander and Benjamin W. Parker and their wives to establish a mission in the Marquesas. Their labours proved unsuccessful, however, and the mission was aborted. They returned to the Sandwich Islands the following year to resume their missionary work.

The <I>Marquesas Collection, 1831-1834, 1853-1918</I>, consists of 2.5 linear feet of manuscript material, including personal letters, formal reports of general meetings and mission station reports. Correspondence by native Hawaiian missionaries to the Hawaiian Evangelical Association in Honolulu is in the Hawaiian language. A portion of this correspondence was translated into English in the 1930s by Rev. Henry Pratt Judd, a member of the Hawaiian Board of Missions and the grandson of American Protestant missionary, Gerrit P. Judd. Nancy J. Morris, PhD. of the University of Hawai'i Special Collections, Hamilton Library, and author of Hawaiian Missionaries Abroad, 1852-1909, also provided translations for some of the documents in the 1980s. Microfilm copies of the original Hawaiian documents can be found at PMB 1170. See Finding aids for details.

Hawaiian Mission Children’s Society

Log of whaler Vigilant

  • AU PMB MS 976
  • Collectie
  • 19 October 1831 - 2 August 1835

The Vigilant was a barque of 405 tons. Mr R.J. Swain is a great-great-grandson of the logkeeper.

The Vigilant left London in October 1831, rounded the Cape of Good Hope and headed for Indonesia. Calls were made at Timor (March-Juen 1832) and Ternate (July-August). The Vigilant then sailed north of New Guinea, whaled in New Ireland waters (September-December) and continued to the Bay of Islands, New Zealand (21 February - 23 March 1833). Subsequent calls were made at Tongatapu, Tonga (29 June - 5 July), Tutuila, Samoa (10-12 July), Bay of Islands (14-30 October; 30 January - 4 February 1834), Norfolk Island (20-21 February), Bay of Islands (31 March - 30 April), 'Eua, Tonga (30-31 May), Vava'u, Tonga (15-22 June), Manu'a, Samoa (25-27 June, 7-11 September), Savai'i, Samoa (2-4 September), Sydney (19 October - 24 November), Bay of Islands (28 February - 18 March 1835). The ship returned to England via Cape Horn on 2 August 1835. Following the log are drafts of letters written in 1841 to Robert Duke and others about money matters and another command for Swain.

Swain Samuel

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