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Archivistische beschrijving
Vanuatu Collectie With digital objects
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Records, accounts, notes, correspondence

  • AU PMB MS 55
  • Collectie
  • 1908 - 1969

Kalsakau became chief of Fila Island in 1908 and held that position for many years. He was a member of one of the most notable New Hebridean families of Efate. His three sons, Graham, John and Makau are (1969) also outstanding members of the New Hebridean community.

  1. Lists of important dates and events in Kalsakau's career and family life.
  2. Record of births and deaths (1908-1961)
  3. Accounts relating to business, household and the marriage feast of his son Makau (March 1, 1945)
  4. Record (September 1956) of visit by Gen. and Mme de Gaulle
  5. Centenary Celebrations, Erakor, 1st May, 1945 - an account of the settlement of Erakor by the early missionaries.
  6. School fees collected in 1943 - list of families and amount paid.
  7. Lease of land owned by Kalsakau.
  8. Celebration of the 105th Anniversary of the New Hebrides Presbyterian Mission, May 1, 1950.
  9. Correspondence regarding residency of Fila Island Reserve.
  10. Discipline book (1911-1943) in which fines and other punishments against members of Kalsakau's village are recorded.

Kalsakau

Lynette Walker Photographs of New Hebrides (Vanuatu)

  • AU PMB PHOTO 115
  • Collectie
  • 1958-1965

Deaconess Lynette Grace Walker served as an educational missionary in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) for the Australian Presbyterian Board of Missions. Between 1958-1965, Lyn was based in South West Bay, Malekula where she was a teacher at the South West Bay District School. She also developed a new syllabus.

This collection of annotated black and white photographs and postcards features many missionaries to the New Hebrides from Australia and New Zealand. The collection also depicts landscapes, village scenes, wedding celebrations and Lyn’s departure from South West Bay in 1965. The collection also includes an article from the July 1962 issue of Presbyterian Life magazine about the status of missionary work in New Hebrides and a missionary newsletter to supporters which includes an invitation to the opening of the rebuilt Boyd Memorial Clinic.

Walker, Lynette Grace

Lynette Walker Photographs of Presbyterian Pastors in New Hebrides (Vanuatu)

  • AU PMB PHOTO 116
  • Collectie
  • 1958-1998

Deaconess Lynette Grace Walker served as an educational missionary in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) for the Australian Presbyterian Board of Missions. Between 1958-1965, Walker was based in South West Bay, Malekula where she was a teacher at the South West Bay District School. Walker also served as Deaconess for Central Islands (Efate and adjacent islands) from1971-1975. Based in Vila, she worked with women, young people and Sunday school teachers. Between 1975-1977, she took on the post of Deaconess for Southern Islands (Tanna, Aniwa, Aneityum, Futuna and Erromango).
This collection of 27 colour slides shows pastors with the Presbyterian Church of Vanuatu. Photos were taken by Walker throughout her missionary service in New Hebrides and on subsequent visits.

Walker, Lynette Grace

Lynette Walker Photographs of New Hebrides (Vanuatu) and New Caledonia

  • AU PMB PHOTO 118
  • Collectie
  • 1958-1998

Deaconess Lynette Grace Walker served as an educational missionary in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) for the Australian Presbyterian Board of Missions. Between 1958-1965, Lyn was based in South West Bay, Malekula where she worked as a teacher at the South West Bay District School. She also developed a new syllabus. From 1971, Walker served as Deaconess for Central Islands (Efate and adjacent islands). Based in Vila, she worked with women, young people and Sunday school teachers. Between 1975-1977, she took on the post of Deaconess for Southern Islands (Tanna, Aniwa, Aneityum, Futuna and Erromango). Walker returned to live in Melbourne in April, 1977 but has continued to visit Vanuatu over the years.

This collection of 319 digitised colour 35mm slides is a selection of images from her time working in New Hebrides, including in South West Bay, Vila, Ambrym, Nguna, Lelepa, Paama and Tanna. The images include church activities, landscapes, volcanic activity and people. There are also photographs of New Caledonia, visited en route to New Hebrides. This collection includes photos of Walker's return to South West Bay in 1998 for celebrations to mark the Golden Jubilee or 50th anniversary of the Presbyterian Church of Vanuatu (PVC).

Walker, Lynette Grace

Lynette Walker Photographs of Vanuatu

  • AU PMB PHOTO 119
  • Collectie
  • 1988-1998

Deaconess Lynette Grace Walker served as an educational missionary in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) for the Australian Presbyterian Board of Missions. Between 1958-1965, Walker was based in South West Bay, Malekula where she worked as a teacher at the South West Bay District School. From 1971, Walker served as Deaconess for Central Islands (Efate and adjacent islands). Based in Vila, she worked with women, young people and Sunday school teachers. Between 1975-1977, she took on the post of Deaconess for Southern Islands. Walker returned to live in Melbourne in April, 1977 but has continued to visit Vanuatu over the years.

This collection of 389 digitised colour 35mm slides is a selection of images from three return visits in 1988, 1995 and 1998. 1995 marked the centenary anniversary of the arrival of Robert Boyd, the first missionary to South West Bay. 1998 marked the Golden Jubilee or 50th anniversary of the Presbyterian Church of Vanuatu (PVC). This collection features images of Port Vila, Iririki Island, Onesua (Efate), Talua (Espiritu Santo), South West Bay, Lawa, Lorlow, Wintua (Malekula) and Lenakel (Tanna). The photos feature former missionaries and church office bearers, Presbyterian Women’s Missionary Union (PWMU) activities, historical plaques and the Dayspring IV canoe.

Walker, Lynette Grace

Reverend Conrad Stallan's photographs of the New Hebrides (Vanuatu), 1940-1946

  • AU PMB PHOTO 107
  • Collectie
  • 1940 - 1946

A collection of 58 photographs taken by Reverend Conrad George Stallan, who was stationed on Malekula in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) from 1940-1946. Supported by the John G Paton Mission Fund, Rev Stallan was based in Wintua, South West Bay. Stallan was a keen photographer. He maintained a dark room to develop and print his photographs in both Malekula and Georgetown, British Guiana, where he was stationed in 1955-1961.

Stallan, Conrad George (1904-1980)

New Hebrides Mission photographs, c.1950-1969

  • AU PMB PHOTO 98
  • Collectie
  • 1950-1969

This is a collection of 79 images of the Presbyterian mission in the New Hebrides, produced by the New Zealand Presbyterian Church Department of Communications in the 1950s and 1960s. The collection contains photographs of missionary families to the New Hebrides, including Rev. A.G. Horwell who was on Epi, Rev R.W. Murray, and Reverend and Mrs Hyslop. There are also several photographs of named ni-Vanautu pastors and teachers involved with the church including a Pastor Moses, Pastor Kalorib, and K.M. Shing. Many photographs relate to church and mission activities including: the Boys Brigade on Tongoa, bible classes, and Sunday school classes. There are also village scenes and images containing unidentified New Hebridean /ni-Vanuatu people.
The photographs were taken on multiple islands including Epi, Malekula and Tongoa.

The New Hebrides Mission from the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand:
The Presbyterian Church began sending missionaries to the New Hebrides (today known as Vanuatu) in the mid-19th Century. The first missionary was Rev. John Geddie of the Presbyterian Church of Nova Scotia who arrived on the island of Aneityum in 1848. Subsequent missionaries came from the Presbyterian Churches of New Zealand, Canada, Scotland and Australia (Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and New South Wales).

In New Zealand an interest in supporting a Christian mission to the New Hebrides was fostered when Rev. John Inglis of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland toured the country in 1852 following a three month tour of the New Hebrides and Solomon Islands. In that same year, Inglis and his wife joined Geddie on Aneityum. Rev. John Inglis continued to send regular reports of his work to New Zealand, leading to increasing interest from the Church there in sending their own missionaries to the islands.

The Presbyterian Church of New Zealand was at that time divided up into the “Northern Church” and the “Southern Church” (consisting of the Provinces of Otago and Southland). The Southern Church was based on the ideals of the Free Church of Scotland and these principles influenced its mission work for many years. For over 40 years the two Churches worked separately, with mission activities during this time operating independently of each other.

Over several decades the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand sent a number of missionaries to the New Hebrides including the following people. The information below includes the missionaries' date of arrival in the New Hebrides, the name of the missionary and the name of the main island on which they worked:
1866, Rev. William Watt, Tanna
1870, Rev. Peter Milne, Nguna
1879, Rev. Oscar Michelsen, Tongoa
1885, Rev. Charles Murray, Ambrym
1889, Rev. Thomas Smaill, Epi
1892, Rev. Dr. Lamb, Ambrym
1899, Dr. John Bowie, Ambrym
1903, Rev. Thomas Riddle, Epi
1905, Rev. William V. Milne, Nguna (born on Nguna in 1877)
1932, Rev. Basil Nottage, Tongoa
1938, Rev. Ken Crump, Nguna
1941, Rev. J.G. Miller, Tongoa
1944, Rev. Ian Muir, Emae and Epi
1948, Rev. A.G. Horwell, Epi

In the early years there was no organised or reliable shipping service to the individual islands of the New Hebrides so it was important for the Church to have their own vessel to bring regular supplies from Australia and New Zealand. A boat was also necessary for transport to other mission stations. Although the New Hebrides missionaries were responsible for their home churches and allotted areas and islands, they worked closely together on common issues and met annually for a mission Synod meeting. New Zealand Presbyterian Church worked in conjunction with the Australian Presbyterian Church to raise money and purchased a mission supply vessel, the “Dayspring I”. This 115 ton brigantine was launched in Nova Scotia, Canada, in 1863. It was lost in a hurricane ten years later and replaced by a second hand schooner, the “Dayspring II” in 1876. The Dayspring II was sold prior to 1890 as she was too small and slow and uncomfortable to sail in. The Australian missionary Dr. John G. Paton raised £6000 during a visit to Britain in 1884-1885 and later increased the donations to £7000. The “Dayspring III” was built on the Clyde in Scotland to the order of the Victorian Presbyterian Church Foreign Missions Committee. She was 157 feet long and arrived in Australia in 1895. On only her fourth voyage to the islands, she sank on the 16th October 1896 after striking an uncharted coral reef near New Caledonia. The decision was made not to replace the vessel.

The New Hebrides Mission shared a practical concern for the everyday needs of island people. In addition to converting local people to Christianity, the missionaries worked to improve education, through the introduction of schools where the training of local mission teachers was initiated. The Tangoa Teachers’ Training Institute opened at Tangoa, South Santo, in 1895. The purpose of the Institute was to train local teachers and it was supported by all the Protestant missions working throughout the New Hebrides. Missionaries also worked to improve health education and services and encouraged the production of arrowroot and island trading as a means to generate revenue. Arrowroot powder was shipped to New Zealand and other countries, where it was initially distributed by women’s missionary groups and later by commercial organisations. The funds from the sale of arrowroot were used to build additional churches in the islands and, in some cases, as a donation towards New Zealand mission funds to be used elsewhere. From 1880 to 1918 on Nguna alone, over 26 tons of arrowroot was produced.

By 1910, the work of the New Hebrides Mission was declining. This was partly due to a rapidly decreasing population on the islands and a feeling that little room existed for further expansion of mission work, as by then most areas were adequately covered. The reduction in population was primarily caused by introduced European illnesses and epidemics which decimated the local population. The Queensland labour trade had also had an impact on the local population, with many locals having decided to remain in Queensland.

In 1947 there was a general consensus held among the Island missionaries that the local church was ready to assume control of its own affairs. A constitution was drawn up, and after amendments submitted by the New Zealand and Australian Mission Committees and the New Hebrides Mission Synod, it was adopted. At a Centennial Synod meeting in 1948, the 100th anniversary of the arrival of the Rev. John Geddie, the local church was placed fully in charge of its own affairs. The island mission councils for Australia and New Zealand were then limited to the affairs of their immediate mission staff. The New Zealand Church continued to provide a large financial grant to the New Hebrides Presbyterian Church. A continued focus remained on training church leaders and education more generally. The Tangoa Training Institute later introduced a curriculum of advanced theological studies.
In the early 1950s, the New Zealand Missions Committee responded to the request for assistance to establish a High School at Onesua on Efate, along with funds and personnel to set up and run a small hospital on Tongoa. The Committee viewed this project as a practical means by which the New Zealand Church could provide for a social need rather than a means for furthering evangelistic opportunities. This policy shift in Mission funding opened up other opportunities for aid from the New Zealand Church including developing Navota Farm and opening the Maropa religious bookshop in Port Vila, training local islanders to be trades people and undertake the building work. The New Zealand Bible Class volunteer scheme sent out young people during the 1960s to assist with building, administration and nursing. The Mission, at the request of the Presbyterian Church of the New Hebrides, divested itself of all remaining authority in the Islands so that the New Zealand missionaries effectively worked for the New Hebrides Church. In 1965 a memorandum was prepared which defined the terms of “responsible partnership” and sought to define the responsibilities of each partner. The Church continues today as the Presbyterian Church of Vanuatu.

For more information about New Hebrides Mission collections at the Archives of the Presbyterian Research Centre, Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa, and New Zealand, see: http://www.archives.presbyterian.org.nz/missions/newhebrideshistory.htm

Department of Communications

Archival papers of Reverend Conrad Stallan, 1931-1947

  • AU PMB MS 1433
  • Collectie
  • 1931-1947

Five documents from the family collection of Conrad Stallan, who was employed as a missionary in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) from 1940-46, including:

  • Typescript document (3pp.)
  • Letter from Boys High School Malua, author unknown, 19 Dec 1931, Ts. (9pp.)
  • ‘1-447’, notebook containing a numbered list of photograph titles and dates (Mar 1940-Jun 1943)
  • ‘448-663/ 700 (-1947)’, notebook of photograph titles and dates (Jun 1943-1947)
  • Notes on Samoan Islands, n.d. Ms, (7pp.)

Stallan, Conrad George (1904-1980)

Reverend Conrad Stallan, album of photographs, New Hebrides (Vanuatu), 1940-1946

  • AU PMB PHOTO 109
  • Collectie
  • 1940 - 1946

Album of photographs and two loose images taken by Reverend Conrad George Stallan, who was a missionary stationed on Malekula in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) from 1940-1946. Supported by the John G Paton Mission Fund, Stallan was based in Wintua, South West Bay, Malekula, with his wife Christina (Chriss) and their children Donovan, Roger, Janet, and Margaret. During his life, Stallan was a keen photographer. He maintained a dark room on Malekula to develop and print his photographs, as well as later while stationed in Georgetown, British Guiana, 1955-1961.

The original images are mounted in a barkcloth/tapa bound album, accompanied by typed captions. See item PMB PHOTO 109-000 for a PDF of full album layout. The album contains numerous images of the Big Nambas region of Malekula. During the war, regulations forbade Europeans, including Stallan, from entering the Big Nambas area. However, Stallan was lucky enough to accompany a US Army patrol to the area, which included a member of their publicity section. Some of the images are possibly taken by that US photographer. High Chief Nisai of Amokh is one of the named people in those images, and it is likely multiple photographs are from Amokh village itself. The album also includes photographs from South West Bay, Malekula, captured around the Wintua mission. Several young women associated with the mission are named in the photographs (see individual items)

Stallan, Conrad George (1904-1980)

Reverend Conrad Stallan, album of photographs of the New Hebrides (Vanuatu), 1940-1946

  • AU PMB PHOTO 110
  • Collectie
  • 1940 - 1946

Album of 226 photographs taken by Reverend Conrad George Stallan, who was a missionary stationed on Malekula in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) from 1940-1946. The original images are mounted in an album, accompanied by handwritten captions, some of which are now faded. See item PMB PHOTO 110-000 for a PDF of full album layout. Many images are of the Stallan family, particularly in the years 1940-41, as well as a number of named Malekulan adults and children. The album includes photographs captured at the Wintua mission station, and Mindu and Aulua villages, Malekula, as well as on Toman island and several images of Santo.

Supported by the John G Paton Mission Fund, Stallan was based in Wintua, South West Bay, Malekula, with his wife Christina (Chriss) and their children Donovan, Roger, Janet, and Margaret. During his life, Stallan was a keen photographer. He maintained a dark room on Malekula to develop and print his photographs, as well as later while stationed in Georgetown, British Guiana, 1955-1961.

Stallan, Conrad George (1904-1980)

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