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New Hebrides Mission Photographs, 1885-1950

  • AU PMB PHOTO 87
  • Collectie
  • 1885-1950

This collection includes 112 images. Most of the images include portraits of European Presbyterian missionaries or ni-Vanuatu people. Many of the portraits include key New Hebrides missionaries who travelled to the new Hebrides from New Zealand and Scotland. The images include mission group synod photographs and pictures of the missionary children. Some of the pictures show traditional style architecture and cultural practices such as cooking methods and slit drums. Missionary churches, houses and gardens are featured. The images were taken on the islands of Nguna, Tangoa, Tanna, Tongoa, Efate, Futuna, Emae, Ambrym and Malekula.

The New Hebrides Mission from the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand:

The Presbyterian Church began sending missionaries to the New Hebrides (today known as Vanuatu) in the mid-19th Century. The first missionary was Rev. John Geddie of the Presbyterian Church of Nova Scotia who arrived on the island of Aneityum in 1848. Subsequent missionaries came from the Presbyterian Churches of New Zealand, Canada, Scotland and Australia (Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and New South Wales).
In New Zealand an interest in supporting a Christian mission to the New Hebrides was fostered when Rev. John Inglis of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland toured the country in 1852 following a three month tour of the New Hebrides and Solomon Islands. In that same year, Inglis and his wife joined Geddie on Aneityum. Rev. John Inglis continued to send regular reports of his work to New Zealand, leading to increasing interest from the Church there in sending their own missionaries to the islands.
The Presbyterian Church of New Zealand was at that time divided up into the “Northern Church” and the “Southern Church” (consisting of the Provinces of Otago and Southland). The Southern Church was based on the ideals of the Free Church of Scotland and these principles influenced its mission work for many years. For over 40 years the two Churches worked separately, with mission activities during this time operating independently of each other.
Over several decades the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand sent a number of missionaries to the New Hebrides including the following people. The information below includes the missionaries' date of arrival in the New Hebrides, the name of the missionary and the name of the main island on which they worked:
1866, Rev. William Watt, Tanna
1870, Rev. Peter Milne, Nguna
1879, Rev. Oscar Michelsen, Tongoa
1885, Rev. Charles Murray, Ambrym
1889, Rev. Thomas Smaill, Epi
1892, Rev. Dr. Lamb, Ambrym
1899, Dr. John Bowie, Ambrym
1903, Rev. Thomas Riddle, Epi
1905, Rev. William V. Milne, Nguna (born on Nguna in 1877)
1932, Rev. Basil Nottage, Tongoa
1938, Rev. Ken Crump, Nguna
1941, Rev. J.G. Miller, Tongoa
1944, Rev. Ian Muir, Emae and Epi
1948, Rev. A.G. Horwell, Epi
In the early years there was no organised or reliable shipping service to the individual islands of the New Hebrides so it was important for the Church to have their own vessel to bring regular supplies from Australia and New Zealand. A boat was also necessary for transport to other mission stations. Although the New Hebrides missionaries were responsible for their home churches and allotted areas and islands, they worked closely together on common issues and met annually for a mission Synod meeting. New Zealand Presbyterian Church worked in conjunction with the Australian Presbyterian Church to raise money and purchased a mission supply vessel, the “Dayspring I”. This 115 ton brigantine was launched in Nova Scotia, Canada, in 1863. It was lost in a hurricane ten years later and replaced by a second hand schooner, the “Dayspring II” in 1876. The Dayspring II was sold prior to 1890 as she was too small and slow and uncomfortable to sail in. The Australian missionary Dr. John G. Paton raised £6000 during a visit to Britain in 1884-1885 and later increased the donations to £7000. The “Dayspring III” was built on the Clyde in Scotland to the order of the Victorian Presbyterian Church Foreign Missions Committee. She was 157 feet long and arrived in Australia in 1895. On only her fourth voyage to the islands, she sank on the 16th October 1896 after striking an uncharted coral reef near New Caledonia. The decision was made not to replace the vessel.
The New Hebrides Mission shared a practical concern for the everyday needs of island people. In addition to converting local people to Christianity, the missionaries worked to improve education, through the introduction of schools where the training of local mission teachers was initiated. The Tangoa Teachers’ Training Institute opened at Tangoa, South Santo, in 1895. The purpose of the Institute was to train local teachers and it was supported by all the Protestant missions working throughout the New Hebrides. Missionaries also worked to improve health education and services and encouraged the production of arrowroot and island trading as a means to generate revenue. Arrowroot powder was shipped to New Zealand and other countries, where it was initially distributed by women’s missionary groups and later by commercial organisations. The funds from the sale of arrowroot were used to build additional churches in the islands and, in some cases, as a donation towards New Zealand mission funds to be used elsewhere. From 1880 to 1918 on Nguna alone, over 26 tons of arrowroot was produced.
By 1910, the work of the New Hebrides Mission was declining. This was partly due to a rapidly decreasing population on the islands and a feeling that little room existed for further expansion of mission work, as by then most areas were adequately covered. The reduction in population was primarily caused by introduced European illnesses and epidemics which decimated the local population. The Queensland labour trade had also had an impact on the local population, with many locals having decided to remain in Queensland.
In 1947 there was a general consensus held among the Island missionaries that the local church was ready to assume control of its own affairs. A constitution was drawn up, and after amendments submitted by the New Zealand and Australian Mission Committees and the New Hebrides Mission Synod, it was adopted. At a Centennial Synod meeting in 1948, the 100th anniversary of the arrival of the Rev. John Geddie, the local church was placed fully in charge of its own affairs. The island mission councils for Australia and New Zealand were then limited to the affairs of their immediate mission staff. The New Zealand Church continued to provide a large financial grant to the New Hebrides Presbyterian Church. A continued focus remained on training church leaders and education more generally. The Tangoa Training Institute later introduced a curriculum of advanced theological studies.
In the early 1950s, the New Zealand Missions Committee responded to the request for assistance to establish a High School at Onesua on Efate, along with funds and personnel to set up and run a small hospital on Tongoa. The Committee viewed this project as a practical means by which the New Zealand Church could provide for a social need rather than a means for furthering evangelistic opportunities. This policy shift in Mission funding opened up other opportunities for aid from the New Zealand Church including developing Navota Farm and opening the Maropa religious bookshop in Port Vila, training local islanders to be trades people and undertake the building work. The New Zealand Bible Class volunteer scheme sent out young people during the 1960s to assist with building, administration and nursing. The Mission, at the request of the Presbyterian Church of the New Hebrides, divested itself of all remaining authority in the Islands so that the New Zealand missionaries effectively worked for the New Hebrides Church. In 1965 a memorandum was prepared which defined the terms of “responsible partnership” and sought to define the responsibilities of each partner. The Church continues today as the Presbyterian Church of Vanuatu.
For more information about New Hebrides Mission collections at the Archives of the Presbyterian Research Centre, Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa, and New Zealand, see: http://www.archives.presbyterian.org.nz/missions/newhebrideshistory.htm

Foreign Missions Committee

Selection of New Hebrides Mission photographs on boards, 1869-1956

  • AU PMB PHOTO 86
  • Collectie
  • 1869-1956

This collection of 26 photographs mounted on board include images of the New Hebrides Mission in Vanuatu from the mid 19th – mid 20th Century. The photographs include images of the first mission house at Selembanga on Tongoa, ni-Vanuatu people in traditional settings such as mourning, amongst local gardens and near traditional style village huts. There is a photograph of the Tanna volcano crater in 1899, labour boats in Tanna, mission vessels with copra, the 1892 New Hebrides Mission synod, early mission houses on Nguna and the mission house at Dip Point, Ambrym. The collection includes several European missionaries including Rev. P and Mrs. M J Milne, William Watt, Rev. William V. Milne, Rev. O. Michelsen and Rev. B.R.C. Nottage.

Some of the boards include hand written headings which may indicate that they were used as boards to promote the work of the New Hebrides Mission at various presentations in Australia, New Zealand or Scotland.
The New Hebrides Mission from the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand:
The Presbyterian Church began sending missionaries to the New Hebrides (today known as Vanuatu) in the mid-19th Century. The first missionary was Rev. John Geddie of the Presbyterian Church of Nova Scotia who arrived on the island of Aneityum in 1848. Subsequent missionaries came from the Presbyterian Churches of New Zealand, Canada, Scotland and Australia (Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and New South Wales).
In New Zealand an interest in supporting a Christian mission to the New Hebrides was fostered when Rev. John Inglis of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland toured the country in 1852 following a three month tour of the New Hebrides and Solomon Islands. In that same year, Inglis and his wife joined Geddie on Aneityum. Rev. John Inglis continued to send regular reports of his work to New Zealand, leading to increasing interest from the Church there in sending their own missionaries to the islands.
The Presbyterian Church of New Zealand was at that time divided up into the “Northern Church” and the “Southern Church” (consisting of the Provinces of Otago and Southland). The Southern Church was based on the ideals of the Free Church of Scotland and these principles influenced its mission work for many years. For over 40 years the two Churches worked separately, with mission activities during this time operating independently of each other.
Over several decades the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand sent a number of missionaries to the New Hebrides including the following people. The information below includes the missionaries' date of arrival in the New Hebrides, the name of the missionary and the name of the main island on which they worked:
1866, Rev. William Watt, Tanna
1870, Rev. Peter Milne, Nguna
1879, Rev. Oscar Michelsen, Tongoa
1885, Rev. Charles Murray, Ambrym
1889, Rev. Thomas Smaill, Epi
1892, Rev. Dr. Lamb, Ambrym
1899, Dr. John Bowie, Ambrym
1903, Rev. Thomas Riddle, Epi
1905, Rev. William V. Milne, Nguna (born on Nguna in 1877)
1932, Rev. Basil Nottage, Tongoa
1938, Rev. Ken Crump, Nguna
1941, Rev. J.G. Miller, Tongoa
1944, Rev. Ian Muir, Emae and Epi
1948, Rev. A.G. Horwell, Epi
In the early years there was no organised or reliable shipping service to the individual islands of the New Hebrides so it was important for the Church to have their own vessel to bring regular supplies from Australia and New Zealand. A boat was also necessary for transport to other mission stations. Although the New Hebrides missionaries were responsible for their home churches and allotted areas and islands, they worked closely together on common issues and met annually for a mission Synod meeting. New Zealand Presbyterian Church worked in conjunction with the Australian Presbyterian Church to raise money and purchased a mission supply vessel, the “Dayspring I”. This 115 ton brigantine was launched in Nova Scotia, Canada, in 1863. It was lost in a hurricane ten years later and replaced by a second hand schooner, the “Dayspring II” in 1876. The Dayspring II was sold prior to 1890 as she was too small and slow and uncomfortable to sail in. The Australian missionary Dr. John G. Paton raised £6000 during a visit to Britain in 1884-1885 and later increased the donations to £7000. The “Dayspring III” was built on the Clyde in Scotland to the order of the Victorian Presbyterian Church Foreign Missions Committee. She was 157 feet long and arrived in Australia in 1895. On only her fourth voyage to the islands, she sank on the 16th October 1896 after striking an uncharted coral reef near New Caledonia. The decision was made not to replace the vessel.
The New Hebrides Mission shared a practical concern for the everyday needs of island people. In addition to converting local people to Christianity, the missionaries worked to improve education, through the introduction of schools where the training of local mission teachers was initiated. The Tangoa Teachers’ Training Institute opened at Tangoa, South Santo, in 1895. The purpose of the Institute was to train local teachers and it was supported by all the Protestant missions working throughout the New Hebrides. Missionaries also worked to improve health education and services and encouraged the production of arrowroot and island trading as a means to generate revenue. Arrowroot powder was shipped to New Zealand and other countries, where it was initially distributed by women’s missionary groups and later by commercial organisations. The funds from the sale of arrowroot were used to build additional churches in the islands and, in some cases, as a donation towards New Zealand mission funds to be used elsewhere. From 1880 to 1918 on Nguna alone, over 26 tons of arrowroot was produced.
By 1910, the work of the New Hebrides Mission was declining. This was partly due to a rapidly decreasing population on the islands and a feeling that little room existed for further expansion of mission work, as by then most areas were adequately covered. The reduction in population was primarily caused by introduced European illnesses and epidemics which decimated the local population. The Queensland labour trade had also had an impact on the local population, with many locals having decided to remain in Queensland.
In 1947 there was a general consensus held among the Island missionaries that the local church was ready to assume control of its own affairs. A constitution was drawn up, and after amendments submitted by the New Zealand and Australian Mission Committees and the New Hebrides Mission Synod, it was adopted. At a Centennial Synod meeting in 1948, the 100th anniversary of the arrival of the Rev. John Geddie, the local church was placed fully in charge of its own affairs. The island mission councils for Australia and New Zealand were then limited to the affairs of their immediate mission staff. The New Zealand Church continued to provide a large financial grant to the New Hebrides Presbyterian Church. A continued focus remained on training church leaders and education more generally. The Tangoa Training Institute later introduced a curriculum of advanced theological studies.
In the early 1950s, the New Zealand Missions Committee responded to the request for assistance to establish a High School at Onesua on Efate, along with funds and personnel to set up and run a small hospital on Tongoa. The Committee viewed this project as a practical means by which the New Zealand Church could provide for a social need rather than a means for furthering evangelistic opportunities. This policy shift in Mission funding opened up other opportunities for aid from the New Zealand Church including developing Navota Farm and opening the Maropa religious bookshop in Port Vila, training local islanders to be trades people and undertake the building work. The New Zealand Bible Class volunteer scheme sent out young people during the 1960s to assist with building, administration and nursing. The Mission, at the request of the Presbyterian Church of the New Hebrides, divested itself of all remaining authority in the Islands so that the New Zealand missionaries effectively worked for the New Hebrides Church. In 1965 a memorandum was prepared which defined the terms of “responsible partnership” and sought to define the responsibilities of each partner. The Church continues today as the Presbyterian Church of Vanuatu.
For more information about New Hebrides Mission collections at the Archives of the Presbyterian Research Centre, Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa, and New Zealand, see: http://www.archives.presbyterian.org.nz/missions/newhebrideshistory.htm

Foreign Missions Committee

New Hebrides Mission photographs, 1880-1978

  • AU PMB PHOTO 89
  • Collectie
  • 1880-1978

This collection of 157 images includes photographs of the New Hebrides mission in Vanuatu. The islands featured include Tangoa, Tanna, Efate, Nguna and Paama. The photographs show ni-Vanuatu undertaking domestic activities such as bread making, coconut grating, basket and mat weaving and tending to domestic animals. There are many photographs of New Hebrides missionaries, as well as visiting missionaries from New Zealand, and their families. There are photographs of the New Hebrides Mission boats, the Dayspring I, II and III. This collection includes several pictures of church meetings including the Paama Synod of 1912 and pictures of the Port Vila harbour and main street from 1929. There are a few photographs of the Yasur volcano eruption in Tanna from 1915. There are several photographs of students and staff at Onesua High School including the construction of the new Onesua High School chapel in 1978.
The New Hebrides Mission from the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand:
The Presbyterian Church began sending missionaries to the New Hebrides (today known as Vanuatu) in the mid-19th Century. The first missionary was Rev. John Geddie of the Presbyterian Church of Nova Scotia who arrived on the island of Aneityum in 1848. Subsequent missionaries came from the Presbyterian Churches of New Zealand, Canada, Scotland and Australia (Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and New South Wales).
In New Zealand an interest in supporting a Christian mission to the New Hebrides was fostered when Rev. John Inglis of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland toured the country in 1852 following a three month tour of the New Hebrides and Solomon Islands. In that same year, Inglis and his wife joined Geddie on Aneityum. Rev. John Inglis continued to send regular reports of his work to New Zealand, leading to increasing interest from the Church there in sending their own missionaries to the islands.
The Presbyterian Church of New Zealand was at that time divided up into the “Northern Church” and the “Southern Church” (consisting of the Provinces of Otago and Southland). The Southern Church was based on the ideals of the Free Church of Scotland and these principles influenced its mission work for many years. For over 40 years the two Churches worked separately, with mission activities during this time operating independently of each other.
Over several decades the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand sent a number of missionaries to the New Hebrides including the following people. The information below includes the missionaries' date of arrival in the New Hebrides, the name of the missionary and the name of the main island on which they worked:
1866, Rev. William Watt, Tanna
1870, Rev. Peter Milne, Nguna
1879, Rev. Oscar Michelsen, Tongoa
1885, Rev. Charles Murray, Ambrym
1889, Rev. Thomas Smaill, Epi
1892, Rev. Dr. Lamb, Ambrym
1899, Dr. John Bowie, Ambrym
1903, Rev. Thomas Riddle, Epi
1905, Rev. William V. Milne, Nguna (born on Nguna in 1877)
1932, Rev. Basil Nottage, Tongoa
1938, Rev. Ken Crump, Nguna
1941, Rev. J.G. Miller, Tongoa
1944, Rev. Ian Muir, Emae and Epi
1948, Rev. A.G. Horwell, Epi
In the early years there was no organised or reliable shipping service to the individual islands of the New Hebrides so it was important for the Church to have their own vessel to bring regular supplies from Australia and New Zealand. A boat was also necessary for transport to other mission stations. Although the New Hebrides missionaries were responsible for their home churches and allotted areas and islands, they worked closely together on common issues and met annually for a mission Synod meeting. New Zealand Presbyterian Church worked in conjunction with the Australian Presbyterian Church to raise money and purchased a mission supply vessel, the “Dayspring I”. This 115 ton brigantine was launched in Nova Scotia, Canada, in 1863. It was lost in a hurricane ten years later and replaced by a second hand schooner, the “Dayspring II” in 1876. The Dayspring II was sold prior to 1890 as she was too small and slow and uncomfortable to sail in. The Australian missionary Dr. John G. Paton raised £6000 during a visit to Britain in 1884-1885 and later increased the donations to £7000. The “Dayspring III” was built on the Clyde in Scotland to the order of the Victorian Presbyterian Church Foreign Missions Committee. She was 157 feet long and arrived in Australia in 1895. On only her fourth voyage to the islands, she sank on the 16th October 1896 after striking an uncharted coral reef near New Caledonia. The decision was made not to replace the vessel.
The New Hebrides Mission shared a practical concern for the everyday needs of island people. In addition to converting local people to Christianity, the missionaries worked to improve education, through the introduction of schools where the training of local mission teachers was initiated. The Tangoa Teachers’ Training Institute opened at Tangoa, South Santo, in 1895. The purpose of the Institute was to train local teachers and it was supported by all the Protestant missions working throughout the New Hebrides. Missionaries also worked to improve health education and services and encouraged the production of arrowroot and island trading as a means to generate revenue. Arrowroot powder was shipped to New Zealand and other countries, where it was initially distributed by women’s missionary groups and later by commercial organisations. The funds from the sale of arrowroot were used to build additional churches in the islands and, in some cases, as a donation towards New Zealand mission funds to be used elsewhere. From 1880 to 1918 on Nguna alone, over 26 tons of arrowroot was produced.
By 1910, the work of the New Hebrides Mission was declining. This was partly due to a rapidly decreasing population on the islands and a feeling that little room existed for further expansion of mission work, as by then most areas were adequately covered. The reduction in population was primarily caused by introduced European illnesses and epidemics which decimated the local population. The Queensland labour trade had also had an impact on the local population, with many locals having decided to remain in Queensland.
In 1947 there was a general consensus held among the Island missionaries that the local church was ready to assume control of its own affairs. A constitution was drawn up, and after amendments submitted by the New Zealand and Australian Mission Committees and the New Hebrides Mission Synod, it was adopted. At a Centennial Synod meeting in 1948, the 100th anniversary of the arrival of the Rev. John Geddie, the local church was placed fully in charge of its own affairs. The island mission councils for Australia and New Zealand were then limited to the affairs of their immediate mission staff. The New Zealand Church continued to provide a large financial grant to the New Hebrides Presbyterian Church. A continued focus remained on training church leaders and education more generally. The Tangoa Training Institute later introduced a curriculum of advanced theological studies.
In the early 1950s, the New Zealand Missions Committee responded to the request for assistance to establish a High School at Onesua on Efate, along with funds and personnel to set up and run a small hospital on Tongoa. The Committee viewed this project as a practical means by which the New Zealand Church could provide for a social need rather than a means for furthering evangelistic opportunities. This policy shift in Mission funding opened up other opportunities for aid from the New Zealand Church including developing Navota Farm and opening the Maropa religious bookshop in Port Vila, training local islanders to be trades people and undertake the building work. The New Zealand Bible Class volunteer scheme sent out young people during the 1960s to assist with building, administration and nursing. The Mission, at the request of the Presbyterian Church of the New Hebrides, divested itself of all remaining authority in the Islands so that the New Zealand missionaries effectively worked for the New Hebrides Church. In 1965 a memorandum was prepared which defined the terms of “responsible partnership” and sought to define the responsibilities of each partner. The Church continues today as the Presbyterian Church of Vanuatu.
For more information about New Hebrides Mission collections at the Archives of the Presbyterian Research Centre, Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa, and New Zealand, see: http://www.archives.presbyterian.org.nz/missions/newhebrideshistory.htm

Foreign Missions Committee

Resident Commissioner's Office: Correspondence with Pukapuka Resident Agents

  • AU PMB MS 1411
  • Collectie
  • 1921-1953

This collection includes correspondence between the Resident Commissioner’s office with the Pukapuka Resident agents. Topics covered include correspondence, memorandums, telegrams, medical news, health alerts on the island, beetles and insects, burial of the dead, building proposals, ordering supplies from Burns Philp, health, trade and vital statistics, land and succession cases, native school, disputes.
Information about plants, legal cases, improvement to the residency, public works and water supplies, shipping etc.
Includes information on the hurricane damage of 19 Feb 1962, government properties, school inventory, another hurricane in January 1944, Maude's inspection of the islands for possible relocation of Gilbert Islanders on 17 August 1944, annual reports, mat making, shipping of copra
Includes correspondence, information on unrest in Pukapuka and copra growing and shipping.
Includes correspondence, information on the island council, re-purchase of Nassau island with a proposal for working and settling on Nassa in September 1950, information on coconut termites in September 1950

Cook Islands Administration

Archives of the Cook Islands Christian Church

  • AU PMB MS 1410
  • Collectie
  • 1849-2013

This collection includes copies of London Missionary Society birth records from 1849 – 1951, Minutes of the Cook Islands Christian Church General Assembly 1950-1972, Baptism and Burial Records Avarua Church 1977-1987, Baptism, Marriage and Burial Records Arorangi Church 1949-1978, Baptism and Burial Records Arorangi Church 1976-2003, Baptism and Burial Records Arorangi 1994-2008, Baptism and Burial Records, Titikaveka 1973-2009, Baptism and Burial Records, Matavera 1978-2008, Notice of intention to marriage records, Akakiteanga Akaipoipo, Avarua 1919-1974.

Cook Islands Christian Church

Diocesan archives

  • AU PMB MS 1064
  • Collectie
  • 1891-1993

A detailed inventory is available.

  1. Official Diocesan records, consisting chiefly of correspondence, financial records and reports. The records document the full range of the activities of the Catholic Church in the Cook Islands, including such matters as: relations with the Holy See; regional relations with the Delegations Apostolic in Sydney and Wellington, with CEPAC (Conferentia Episcopalis Pacifici) and with neighbouring Dioceses; parish activities; diocesan management and personnel; Catholic education in the islands; theological and liturgical matters; the activities of the lay apostolate and youth clubs; relations with the civil government of the Cook Islands; relations with the Netherlands Province and with the Marist Fathers; relations with other Christian Churches; relations with international mission aid societies; and records of church property.<br>(Reels 1-49 and Reel 11A)<BR>2. Dictionary, Rarotongan/Dutch, by Mgr Ubald Lehman, vol. 2, c.1940s. (Reel 49)<BR>3. Parish registers of baptisms, marriages, deaths, confirmations and school enrolment, 1894-1993. (Reels 50-51)<BR>4. Diaries of Mgr Bernadine Castanie, 1921-39 (in French) and of Bishop Ubald Lehman, 1939-48 (in Dutch). (Reel 52).
    See Finding aids for details.

Catholic Church Diocese of Rarotonga and Niue

Miscellaneous manuscripts

  • AU PMB MS 1065
  • Collectie
  • 1933 - 1970

Independent Society established in 1963 with initial New Zealand Government support.

  1. Shipping Notes compiled by W.G. Coppell, 1962-67, nos. 1-149 (MS 72).<BR>Typescript research notes consisting of extracts from various primary and secondary sources referring to ships which have visited the Cook Islands.<BR>2. A.B. Donald and Co. Cook Islands Shipping Register, May 1949 to November 1970.<BR>3. Narrative of Charles James Ward (born 1856, died 1933) of Rarotonga, prepared by G.H. Davis, Postmaster, 1933 - typescript, 11 pages (MS 16). Ward first visited Rarotonga in 1881. He later settled there, working initially as a skipper of island schooners and later as a storekeeper.<BR>4. Correspondence of William McBirney (born c.1871, died 1956), 1947-55, relating to the introduction of plants to the Cook Islands (MS 15).

Cook Islands Library and Museum Society

Miscellaneous manuscripts

  • AU PMB MS 1066
  • Collectie
  • 1847-1977

Please see entry for PMB 1065

  1. Maori Culture, Rakahanga Island (MS 29). Records of surviving linguistic usages collected in 1956. Given by Apolo Lameka, written by David Alepha, translated by Nooroa Kairenga. (6pp, typescript)<BR>2. Various Acts of the Rarotonga Council, 1893, 1895 (MS 30). Consists of mss drafts and printed versions of Acts in both English and Rarotongan. Includes holograph letter from J.K. Hutchin to F.J. Moss, British Resident, Rarotonga, 26 August 1897 relating to education.<BR>3. English translation of Maretu (MS 28), the story of a London Missionary Society pastor who died in 1880. (n.d., 30 pp, typescript)<BR>4. Correspondence of Lionel H. Trenn, Registrar of the Cook Islands, regarding the design of the national flag, 1958 (MS 26). Mss and typescript, in English and Rarotongan.<BR>5. Inventory of the F.J. Moss Papers housed in the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington (MS 38). (12 pp, typescript)<BR>6. Death notice for Charles W. Banks, 21.3.1915 at Avarua as published in Torea Katarika, no. 15, April 1915 (MS 36).<BR>7. Folklore tales of the Cook Islands (MS 49). Collected, edited and versified by W. McBirney. (n.d., 135 pp, typescript)<BR>8. Holmes, Susan. Report on Nutrition Survey in the Cook Islands, 1954 (MS 11).(36 pp, typescript)<BR>9. Rules of the Rarotongan Lawn Tennis Club, 1921-22; Proofs of Cook Islands Administration, printed for the Mercants and Planters of the Cook Islands, Auckland, 1920; Typescript notes on the Rarotongan language, author unknown, (MS 78).<BR>10. Correspondence of George Fowlds, 1907-1911.<BR>11. Transcript extracts of London Missionary Society correspondence, 1828-1926, assembled by Resident Commissioner Platts. (typescript)<BR>12. Laws of Aitutaki, 1847 (10 pp) and Blue Laws of Rarotonga, 1879. Printed in Rarotongan. (MS 1)<BR>13. Knight, Mark A. (Otago University), Mangaia: a case study of process and adaptation, 1977 (MS 6). (18 pp, typescript)<BR>14. Savage, Stephen, Iro-Nui-O-Mata (undated holograph mss).

Cook Islands Library and Museum Society

Papers

  • AU PMB MS 1074
  • Collectie
  • 1913-75

Hilda Steadman was the wife of Reverend W. Rex Steadman, who worked as a Methodist Minister in Fiji beteen 1912 and 1940. During their time in Fiji the Steadmans devoted themselves to working with the Indian community. Between 1912 and 1920 they were based at Navua, from 1920 to 1926 they ran the Indian Mission Church and Boys' School at Toorak (Suva), during 1926/27 they worked at Lautoka, after which they returned to Australia for five years. In 1932 they returned to Fiji and spent the next eight years at Rewa organising the Methodist Indian educational system. During her time in Fiji Hilda founded the Indian Women's Benevolent Society. In 1940 the Steadmans retired to South Australia.

The papers include the following items:<BR>- letter by Hilda to her parents written <BR> from Naduri, Vanua Levu, 17/10/20 (10p.)<BR>- newspaper clippings, 1920-41<BR>- Indian work in Fiji, mss, 6p.<BR>- Navua, 1912, typescript, 3p.<BR>- The Rewa sojourn, t/s, 3p.<BR>- Medical work in Fiji, mss, 6p.<BR>- Welfare work among the women of Fiji, <BR> t/s, 5p.<BR>- Reminiscences of Mrs A.J. Small (wife <BR> of Methodist Missionary in Fiji) t/s 25p.<BR>- obituary for Mrs Steadman, 1975<BR>- 214 photographs, 1913-40, depicting the following<BB> the work of the Methodist Church in Fiji<BR>students, colleagues, friends and family of the Steadmans<BR>members of the Indo-Fijian community<BR>scenes in various parts of Fiji<BR>Most photographs are identified.

Steadman, Hilda

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