We are delighted to announce the inaugural Planetary Health Equity Future Leaders program. The Planetary Health Equity Hothouse will welcome a small group of early career researchers and PhD students to join us in Canberra in September 2023.

The thematic focus of the 2023 Planetary Health Equity Future Leaders program is “structural drivers of planetary health inequity”. Through an intensive fortnight of structured workshops and masterclasses related to theory, transdisciplinary research, and knowledge mobilisation, plus time for writing and conversations with the Hothouse team members and wider ANU community, the program offers an opportunity to develop new research skills, spark new collaborative ideas, and create new opportunities for knowledge mobilisation that aims to improve planetary health equity. The Future Leaders program will also involve interaction with the Hothouse 2023 Distinguished Visitor Thinker in Residence and participation in the Hothouse’s Annual Governance for Planetary Health Equity Policy Symposium, where the Hothouse research will be presented alongside insights from policy makers, NGOs, and business groups, including members of the Hothouse Advisory Board.

The program is open to early career researchers and PhD students at institutions across Australia and globally. The selected candidates will join the Hothouse between 4th-15th September 2023. Participants are welcome to remain at the Hothouse to think, write, and discuss for up to 13th of October.

Stay tuned to hear about the program, and the 2023 participants.

ANU Malaysia Update 2023 - 25 years of Reformasi: A Critical Reflection

The 2022 Malaysian general election (GE15) saw long-time oppositional leader and reformist icon Anwar Ibrahim became Prime Minister of Malaysia, more than two decades after he initiated the Reformasi movement that created rippling effects throughout society. From prison to Putrajaya, is Anwar’s success a happy ending for Reformasi? 

Of course, the Reformasi ideals were always about more than just Anwar’s political ambitions. It is crucial and timely to conduct a critical reflection on the many aspects of reform agendas in Malaysia, not only politics but also economic, social, cultural and environmental developments since the late 1990s. For example, to what extent has Malaysia’s economic structure evolved since the 1998 Asian financial crisis? How have artists, cultural and media practitioners pushed for change and to what extent have they succeeded? How has Islam been a driver of change in Malaysia over the past 25 years? How has the notion of indigenous identity evolved? What is the state of civil society today after the height of anti-corruption social movements in the 2010s? Has Malaysia become more of a ‘leader’ in the Southeast Asian region and global affairs, or become more insular and domestic-focused? 

The ANU Malaysia Institute will hold the 2023 Malaysia Update conference (hybrid) in Canberra on Monday 20 March 9am-5pm, followed by a postgraduate symposium (in-person only) on Tuesday 21 March 9am-12.30pm.

The conference will feature leading academics of Malaysian Studies in Australia and Malaysia, as well as contributions from policymakers, students, and the general public.

Speakers on day one include: 
 

  • Sivarasa Rasiah, Former Deputy Minister of Rural Development, Malaysia
  • Azmil Tayeb, Universiti Sains Malaysia
  • James Chin, University of Tasmania
  • Masjaliza Hamzah, Sisters in Islam
  • Ross Tapsell, ANU
  • Faisal Tehrani, National University of Malaysia
  • Ying Xin Show, ANU
  • Björn Dressel, ANU
  • June Rubis, University of Sheffield
  • Nithiyananthan Muthusamy, Khazanah Research Institute
  • Teck Chi Wong, University of Queensland
  • Dian AH Shah, National University of Singapore
  • Robert Cribb, ANU
  • Hugh Robililard, A/g First Assistant Secretary, Southeast Asia Maritime Division, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade


The aim is to offer fresh perspectives on the study of Malaysia as well as to reflect on recent changes in Malaysia’s politics and society.

The conference is open to the general public, with in-person and online-attendance on Monday 20 March. 

 

Program

Monday 20 March (9am-5pm, in-person: Barton Theatre, JG Crawford Building 132, ANU; online: Zoom)

8.30-9am Registration

9.05am 
Welcome and Introduction
 

  • Welcome - Professor Helen Sullivan, Dean, ANU College of Asia & the Pacific
  • Introduction – Associate Professor Ross Tapsell, Director, ANU Malaysia Institute


9.15am Political Update

  • Political Update I : Dr Azmil Tayeb, Universiti Sains Malaysia
  • Political Update II: Professor James Chin, University of Tasmania
  • Q&A

10.15am Media and Civil Society Update

  • Media and Civil Society Update: Masjaliza Hamzah, Sisters in Islam
  • Discussant: Associate Professor Ross Tapsell , ANU
  • Q&A


11.05-11.25am Morning Tea
 
11.25am
Cultural Update

  • Cultural Update: Dr Faisal Tehrani, National University of Malaysia
  • Discussant: Dr Ying Xin Show, ANU
  • Q&A


12.15pm Law and Judiciary Update

  • Law and Judiciary Update: Dr Dian AH Shah, National University of Singapore
  • Discussant: Associate Professor Björn Dressel, ANU
  • Q&A
     

1.05-2pm Lunch


2pm Keynote Speech

  • Keynote Speech: Sivarasa Rasiah, Former Deputy Minister of Rural Development
  • Q&A

 

2.40pm Environment and Indigenous Identity Update

  • Environment and Indigenous Identity Update: June Rubis, University of Sheffield
  • Discussant: Professor Robert Cribb, ANU
  • Q&A

3.30-3.50pm Afternoon Tea

3.50pm Economic Update

  • Economics Update: Nithiyananthan Muthusamy, Khazanah Research Institute
  • Discussant: Teck Chi Wong, University of Queensland
  • Q&A

4.40pm Concluding Remarks: Foreign policy/Australia-Malaysia relations

  • Hugh Robililard, A/g First Assistant Secretary, Southeast Asia Maritime Division, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

 

Tuesday 21 March (Postgraduate Symposium 9am-12.30pm, in-person, Barton Theatre, JG Crawford Building 132, ANU)

9am Panel 1 Politics and Economics 

  • Migration, foreign direct investment, associate policies and their influence on economic development in Malaysia - Stewart Nixon, ANU Crawford School of Public Policy
  • The politics of government-linked companies in Malaysia - Teck Chi Wong (UQ School of Political Science and International Studies) 
  • Competing for influence: The PRC and Taiwan in Kuching - Yun Seh Lee , College of Business, Government and Law, Flinders University
  • Navigating Asian values within the press social responsibility context in Malaysian journalistic practices: a critical ethnography - Aisya Aymanee M Zaharin, UQ School of Social Science
  • Chair: Nicholas Chan, ANU

 

10.30-11am Morning Tea

11am: Panel 2 Law and Judiciary 

  • FELDA settlers and the elimination of discrimination in respect of occupation  - Renuka Balasubramaniam, Melbourne Law School
  • Arbitration agreements in Malaysia: post Tindak Murni - Abdul Muiz Abdul Razak, ANU College of Law
  • Court’s dynamic in a hybrid regime - Amalina Yasmin Mohd Sokri , ANU School of Politics and International Relations
  • The right to work for refugees in Malaysia: past, present, and future policies - Aslam Abd Jalil (UQ School of Social Science) 
  • Chair: Joshua Neoh, ANU

 

12.30 -1pm Lunch

Registration for day one Monday 20 March (9am-5pm) is via Zoom Events Page

PROGRAM & VIRTUAL LOBBY

The Zoom Events page (ZE) is also your program for day one, containing information on the sessions, speakers and fellow attendees (if you share your profile with us). Whether you are attending online or in-person, the ZE event lobby is your hub for all the information you’ll need.
 
CONTACT US

If you have any queries, or need assistance to register in the ZE platform, please let us know. Email: parnerships.cap@anu.edu.au 

Read our handy guide here for instructions. 

Registration for day two - postgraduate symposium (in-person only) on Tuesday 21 March (9am-12.30pm):

Please register via Eventbrite link.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode features Carl Rhodes, Dean and Professor of Organization Studies at the University of Technology Sydney Business School.

Economic inequality is a growing scourge on today’s world. At the apex of this massively unfair system are the global billionaires – an ultra-elite social class who have sequestered the world’s wealth while others languish in poverty and hunger. The immense social and political power billionaires possess cannot be explained by their wealth alone. Coupled with the financial resources billionaires command is a set of inter-connected myths that portray them as a ‘force for good’. This webinar reviews the myths of the good billionaire and how they serve to vanquish the democratic promise of shared prosperity and human flourishing. The webinar also discusses how undermining the myth can lead to a new moral and political vision for a future where the wealth created by human activity is shared by the many rather than hoarded by the few.

Event Speakers

Nick Frank

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

Call for applications - Workshop for PhDs & ECRs

Workshop for graduate research students and early career researchers

Applications due date: Friday 19 May 202
Workshop date: Thursday 20 July 2023
Workshop venue: The Australian National University, Canberra

Eligibility

The workshop is open to all students currently enrolled in a humanities, arts, or political or social science research degree (undergraduate honours, masters with research component, MPhil, PhD) at a higher education institution in Australia or New Zealand, as well as Myanmar nationals or early career researchers in Myanmar or Southeast Asia. Myanmar nationals in Australia are strongly encouraged to apply.

While in-person attendance is preferred for those that can travel within Australia, we will seek to accommodate participants who are unable to travel to Australia by offering the possibility of online participation.

Travel costs and stipends

Participants in Australia will be eligible to receive a travel stipend to offset the costs of travel and accommodation associated with attending the conference.

Expectations

Participants are expected to attend all workshop sessions and to contribute to group discussion. Pre-reading material will be circulated ahead of the workshop. After the workshop, participants will be encouraged to submit a short research paper for publication on the ANU MRC website, in English or Burmese. Participants who have been selected to present a paper at the Myanmar Update will not be required to submit a paper for the workshop but have the option of doing so. Myanmar Update participants whose expenses will be offset by the conference organisers will be expected to attend the workshop.

Application process

Please submit:

  1. a 250-word expression of interest outlining your current research, previous research experience, and interest in attending the workshop; along with
  2. a brief curriculum vitae (2 pages max) to Hunter Marston at Hunter.Marston@anu.edu.au or Samuel Hmung at Samuel.Hmung@anu.edu.au.

Deadline

Deadline for expressions of interest is Friday 19 May 2023.

Successful applicants will be notified shortly after the closing date.

Contact

For further information, please contact: 

ECR Workshop Call for EOI Burmese version: click here

Please note this workshop is by-invitation only. 

 

Myanmar studies since the 2021 coup - Workshop for graduate research students and early career researchers

This workshop will bring together early career researchers and PhD scholars of Myanmar to share experiences and lessons learned regarding fieldwork, methods, research, and writing since the February 2021 coup.

The workshop will comprise of several panels over the course of one day, immediately prior to the ANU Myanmar Update conference on 21-22 July 2023.

The sessions will address fieldwork and data generation, researching at a geographic distance, ethics, policy engagement, and new challenges for those wanting to speak, write and publish about Myanmar.

The ANU Myanmar Research Centre will provide ongoing support to participants who are interested in submitting a paper to the working paper series or sharing their research as part of the MRC Dialogue Series.

This Robert O'Neill War Studies lecture will be delivered by Professor Craig Stockings. 

Robert John O'Neill AO (1936-2023) was an Australian historian and academic of the highest stature. He served at various junctures not only as Head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre (SDSC) here at ANU, and Director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), based in London, but was also Chichele Professor of the History of War at the University of Oxford from 1987 to 2000. He was this nation’s third Official Historian. The 2024 Robert O'Neill War Studies Lecture, delivered by Professor Craig Stockings, tackles the difficult issue of ‘Official Histories’, with a focus upon the current series regarding Australian Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and Australian Peacekeeping Operations in East Timor, and the sometimes-difficult, often-fraught, and ongoing process of producing it.
 

About the speaker
Craig Stockings is a Professor of History, and Head of School at the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra. His areas of academic interest concern general and Australian military history and operational analysis. He has published a history of the army cadet movement in Australia entitled The Torch and the Sword (2007), and a study of the First Libyan Campaign in North Africa 1940-41: Bardia: Myth, Reality and the Heirs of Anzac (2009). He has also edited Zombie Myths of Australian Military History (2010) and Anzac’s Dirty Dozen: 12 Myths of Australian Military History (2012). In 2013 he co-authored an in depth study of the Greek campaign - Swastika over the Acropolis: re-interpreting the Nazi Invasion of Greece in World War II; and co-edited Before the Anzac Dawn: A Military History of Australia to 1915. His most recent book, published by CUP in 2015 is an investigation of turn of the century imperial defence entitled: Britannia’s Shield: Lieutenant-General Sir Edward Hutton and Late Victorian Imperial Defence. He is concurrently appointed at the Official Historian of Australian Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and Australian Peacekeeping Operations in East Timor, is general editor of all six volumes of the series, and has authored the first: Born of Fire and Ash: Australian operations in response to the East Timor crisis 1999-2000, Volume 1: Official History of Peacekeeping Operations in East Timor, UNSW Press.

 

About Robert O'Neill
Emeritus Professor Robert O'Neill AO
was Head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre from 1971 to 1982 and remains an active part of the academic community. One of the world's leading experts on strategic and security studies, O'Neill previously served as Director, International Institute for Strategic Studies, London (1982-1987); Chichele Professor of the History of War at Oxford University (1987-2000); Chairman of the Council of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (1995-2001); and Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Imperial War Museum (1997-2001). In remembrance of his invaluable contributions, it is with great sadness that we note the passing of Emeritus Professor Robert O'Neill AO in 2023, leaving behind a profound legacy in the field of Strategic Studies. 

Agenda 

  • 6.30-7.30pm - Academic Lecture
  • 7.30-8pm - Networking drinks and canapés

 

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please contact the event organiser.

This 2023 John Gee Memorial Lecture will be delivered by Professor Toni Erskine. 

War is changing rapidly – and with it the challenge of ensuring that restraint is exercised in both the resort to force and its conduct. Lethal autonomous weapons systems are able to select and engage targets, with and without human authorisation. Algorithms that rely on big data analytics and machine learning recommend targets for drone strikes and will increasingly infiltrate state-level decision-making on whether to wage war. The spectre of future iterations of these intelligent machines surpassing human capacities, and escaping human control, has recently received a surge in attention as an approaching existential threat. Yet, this future-focused fear obscures a grave and insidious challenge that is already here.

A neglected danger that already-existing AI-enabled weapons and decision-support systems pose is that they change how we (as citizens, soldiers, and states) deliberate, how we act, and how we view ourselves as responsible agents. This has potentially profound ethical, political, and even geo-political implications – well before AI evolves to a point where some fear that it could initiate algorithmic Armageddon. Professor Erskine will argue that our reliance on AI-enabled and automated systems in war threatens to create the perception that we have been displaced as the relevant decision-makers and may therefore abdicate our responsibilities to intelligent machines. She will conclude by asking how these risks might, in turn, affect hard-won international norms of restraint – and how they can be mitigated.

About the speaker

Toni Erskine is Professor of International Politics in the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs at The Australian National University (ANU) and Associate Fellow of the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at Cambridge University. She is also Chief Investigator of the Defence-funded ‘Anticipating the Future of War: AI, Automated Systems, and Resort-to-Force Decision Making’ Research Project and a Founding Member and Chief Investigator of the ‘Humanising Machine Intelligence’ Grand Challenge at ANU. She serves as Academic Lead for the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UN ESCAP)/Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU) ‘AI for the Social Good’ Research Project and in this capacity works closely with government departments in Thailand and Bangladesh. Her research interests include the impact of new technologies (particularly AI) on organised violence; the moral agency and responsibility of formal organisations in world politics; the ethics of war; the responsibility to protect vulnerable populations from mass atrocity crimes (‘R2P’); and the role of joint purposive action and informal coalitions in response to global crises. She is currently completing a book entitled Locating Responsibility: Institutional Moral Agency in a World of Existential Threats and is the recipient of the International Studies Association’s 2024 International Ethics Distinguished Scholar Award.

 

About John Gee

Dr John Gee AO served with distinction as an Australian diplomat in a number of countries. His greatest contribution, however, was in the field of disarmament, where he had a particular interest in chemical weapons. After a period as a Commissioner on the United Nations Special Commission on Iraq following the first Gulf War, he became Deputy Director-General of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons in The Hague, serving there until 2003. In recognition of his achievements, Dr Gee was made a member of the Order of Australia in January 2007. Gee leaves behind a legacy and a memory of a great Australian.


If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please contact the event organiser.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Dr Annabelle Workman, Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures.

The health and other impacts of climate change highlight an imperative for urgent climate action. The health community continues to increase its efforts in raising the alarm on climate-related health impacts and emphasising the health and economic benefits of ambitious and timely action. Yet, projections based on the analysis of current policies and action see us remain on a dangerous path of global warming over 2°C. Using insights from the political economy literature, this seminar will explore what strategies might exist to secure the urgent action needed to develop healthier climate policies.

Event Speakers

Photo of Annabelle, smiling.

Annabelle Workman

Belle is a social scientist driven by the urgent need to develop healthier climate policies. With a background in political science and public health, Belle is now a Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures, co-leading the Health, Wellbeing and Climate Justice Research Program with Professor Kathryn Bowen.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels, with a particular interest in the social and environmental determinants of health equity.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

DISCUSSING AI, AUTOMATED SYSTEMS AND THE FUTURE OF WAR SEMINAR SERIES

This seminar series is part of a two-year (2023-2025) research project on Anticipating the Future of War: AI, Automated Systems, and Resort-to-Force Decision Making, generously funded by the Australian Department of Defence and led by Professor Toni Erskine from the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs.

How should states balance the benefits and risks of employing artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning in nuclear command and control systems? Dr Ben Zala will argue that it is only by placing developments in AI against the larger backdrop of the increasing prominence of a much wider set of strategic non-nuclear capabilities that this question can be adequately addressed. In order to do so, he will make the case for disaggregating the different risks that AI poses to stability as well as examine the specific ways in which it may instead be harnessed to restabilise nuclear-armed relationships. Dr Zala will also identify a number of policy areas that ought to be prioritised by way of mitigating the risks and harnessing the opportunities identified in the short-medium term. 
 

About the speaker
Ben Zala is a Fellow in the Department of International Relations, Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs at ANU. His work focuses on the politics of the great powers and the management of nuclear weapons. He has been a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at Harvard University and is currently an Honorary Fellow at the University of Leicester, UK contributing to the Third Nuclear Age project (https://thethirdnuclearage.com/).


About the chair
Toni Erskine is Professor of International Politics in the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, Australian National University (ANU), and Associate Fellow of the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at Cambridge University. She is Chief Investigator of the Defence-funded 'Anticipating the Future of War: AI, Automated Systems, and Resort-to-Force Decision Making' Research Project and a Chief Investigator and Founding Member of the 'Humanising Machine Intelligence' Grand Challenge at ANU.


If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please contact bell.marketing@anu.edu.au.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Susan Park, Professor of Global Governance in Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney.

Do international grievance mechanisms work? These non-legal, non-binding mechanisms are increasingly used to provide recourse for people suffering environmental and social harm from internationally funded development projects. But, to date, there have been no studies to show how these mechanisms make a difference to people using them.

Susan's research examines whether international grievance mechanisms provide redress for the environmental and social impacts of international development projects, with implications for planetary health. The World Bank lends approximately $20 billion annually to developing states to fund energy, telecommunications, and infrastructure projects to address poverty and improve peoples’ lives. Yet development projects may have dramatic and irreversible environmental and social impacts: loss of lives, livelihoods, and land, a breakdown in community cohesion, species extinction, habitat loss, and irreparable damage to local ecosystems. Despite the World Bank’s Inspection Panel operating for 30 years, we still do not know how it – or any other international grievance mechanism – contributes to improving development conditions. Many people harmed by international development projects choose these non-legal international procedures to have their voices heard often because legal and political options may not be available to them. Indeed, around the world people put themselves in grave harm from state and corporate reprisal for speaking out to protect their environment.

Identifying the use of international grievance mechanisms for addressing injustice is imperative given the rise of conflicts from development projects globally and the increasing number of environmental ‘defenders’ being killed to protect themselves and their environment. International development practices are also contributing to the crossing of known ecological system boundaries globally, such as climate change, habitat loss, and species extinction, the outcome of which is likely to “surpass known experience and which alter …almost all human and natural systems” (UNDRR 2019: 32).

Susan presented uses of an eco-justice frame to analyse grievances against international development projects financed by Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) to investigate whether they lead to improvements for people and ecosystems. An eco-justice approach combines the right of nature (to exist, repair, and regenerate) with environmental procedural rights for humans (to have access to information, to participate, and to have access to justice in environmental matters). Using an eco-justice frame for addressing grievances against development arguably can bring us closer to recognising both human and planetary health.

Event Speakers

Nick Frank

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

Japan's national security strategy in a changing era

The year 2022 was a watershed year for Japanese security strategy. In December of that year, the Kishida administration approved three new strategic documents, which outlined an array of new defence policies: the National Security Strategy (NSS), the National Defense Strategy (NDS) and the Defense Buildup Program.

In this seminar, Professor Yoko Iwama will explain the historical development of Japan's security policy as well as the drastically changing environment in East Asia. How has Japan perceived these changes and what are the responses? She will explore the changes as well as its implications.

Speaker

Dr. Yoko Iwama is Professor of National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS). She graduated from Kyoto University and earned her PhD in Law at the University. Having served as Special Assistant of the Japanese Embassy in Germany (1998-2000), and Associate Professor at GRIPS (2000), she was appointed Professor at GRIPS in 2009.

Her specialty is international security and European diplomatic history centering on NATO, Germany, and nuclear strategy. She has served on numerous government committees including the Council on Reconstruction of a Legal Basis for Security (2006-7, 2013-14). 

The ANU Japan Institute Seminar Series showcases cutting-edge research by leading and emerging scholars based primarily in Australia and Japan. It aims to promote networking among Japan Studies scholars in the two countries and will feature innovative research on the bilateral relationship.

The virtual seminar series will run in 10-week blocks over the two semesters of the academic year (from 2021 to 2023), and will subsequently be made available online for public viewing. Join our mailing list to receive updates and reminders ahead of each seminar.

The virtual seminars will take place from:  

  • 5-6PM Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST)
  • 4-5PM Japan Standard Time (JST) 
  • 3-4PM Singapore Standard Time (STST)

After 1 October, with Australian Eastern Daylight Time

  • 5-6PM Australian Eastern Daylight Time (AEDT)
  • 3-4PM Japan Standard Time (JST) 
  • 2-3PM Singapore Standard Time (STST)

Discussing AI, Automated Systems, and the Future of War Seminar Series

Experts agree that future warfare will be characterized by countries’ use of military technologies enhanced with Artificial Intelligence (AI). These AI-enhanced capabilities are thought to help countries maintain lethal overmatch of adversaries, especially when used in concert with humans. Yet it is unclear what shapes servicemembers’ trust in human-machine teaming, wherein they partner with AI-enhanced military technologies to optimize battlefield performance. In October 2023, Dr Lushenko administered a conjoint survey at the US Army and Naval War Colleges to assess how varying features of AI-enhanced military technologies shape servicemembers’ trust in human-machine teaming. He finds that trust in AI-enhanced military technologies is shaped by a tightly calibrated set of considerations including technical specifications, namely their non-lethal purpose, heightened precision, and human oversight; perceived effectiveness in terms of civilian protection, force protection, and mission accomplishment; and, international oversight. These results provide the first experimental evidence of military attitudes for manned-unmanned teams, which have research, policy, and modernization implications.


About the speaker
Lieutenant Colonel Paul Lushenko,
 PhD is an Assistant Professor and Director of Special Operations at the US Army War College. In addition, he is a Council on Foreign Relations Term Member, Senior Fellow at Cornell University's Tech Policy Institute, Non-Resident Expert at RegulatingAI, and Adjunct Research Lecturer at Charles Sturt University. He is the co-editor of Drones and Global Order: Implications of Remote Warfare for International Society (2022), which is the first book to systematically study the implications of drone warfare on global politics. He is also the co-author of The Legitimacy of Drone Warfare: Evaluating Public Perceptions (2024), which examines public perceptions of the legitimacy of drones and how this affects countries’ policies on and the global governance of drone warfare.

About the chair
Emily Hitchman is the Research Officer on the Anticipating the Future of War: AI, Automated Systems, and Resort-to-Force Decision Making project. Emily is a PhD scholar at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre focussing on the history of the Glomar (‘neither confirm nor deny’) response in the national security context. She is also a 2023 Sir Roland Wilson Scholar, and has appeared on the National Security Podcast speaking about her research, and as a panellist at the 2022 Australian Crisis Simulation Summit speaking about the future of intelligence. Emily has worked professionally across the national security and criminal justice public policy space, including in law enforcement and cyber policy, and holds a Bachelor of Philosophy from The Australian National University.

This seminar series is part of a two-year (2023-2025) research project on Anticipating the Future of War: AI, Automated Systems, and Resort-to-Force Decision Making, generously funded by the Australian Department of Defence and led by Professor Toni Erskine from the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs.


If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please contact bell.marketing@anu.edu.au.

China, Development and International Order Seminar Series

This seminar examines the Soviet occupation of Northeast China (Manchuria) and Nationalist China’s industrial reconstruction efforts in the years following Japan's defeat in World War II. During the Second Sino–Japanese War (1937–1945), China’s Nationalist government cultivated heavy industry SOEs in the inland region. Following Japan’s surrender, the Soviets initially occupied Manchuria, extracting copious industrial equipment from Angang and other Japanese enterprises. Despite this, Manchuria retained superior industrial facilities compared to other parts of China. After the Soviet retreat in the spring of 1946, the Nationalist government consolidated and restructured formerly Japanese enterprises into large-scale Chinese state-owned enterprises (SOEs), including Anshan Iron and Steel Works (Angang). The Nationalists partly reconstructed these SOEs by employing resident Japanese engineers while building on their experience running SOEs in the inland region and sending for Chinese managers and engineers from inland. The Japanese and Nationalists thus unintentionally provided the foundations for the Chinese Communist Party’s socialist industrialization after 1948. In this seminar, Koji Hirata will reflect on how this moment of post-war industrialisation shapes our understanding of development, international order, and developmental states in world history.
 

About the speaker
Dr. Koji Hirata is a research fellow in the School of Philosophical, Historical, and International Studies at Monash University. After graduating from the University of Tokyo, he completed his M.Phil in modern Chinese history at the University of Bristol. He then spent several years in Taiwan, China, and Russia, studying the Chinese and Russian languages, before moving to California to do his Ph.D. in history at Stanford University. He was a Research Fellow (JRF) at Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge before coming to Monash. Koji’s research touches on modern China, Japan, and Russia/Soviet Union with broader implications for the global history of capitalism and socialism. His first book, Making Mao's Steelworks: Industrial Manchuria and the Transnational Origins of Chinese Socialism will be published by Cambridge University Press in July 2024.

 

About the chair
Amy King is Associate Professor in the Strategic & Defence Studies Centre at The Australian National University, and Deputy Director (Research) in the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs. She is the author of China-Japan Relations after World War Two: Empire, Industry and War, 1949-1971 (Cambridge University Press, 2016). The holder of an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellowship and a Westpac Research Fellowship, she leads a team researching China’s role in shaping the international economic order.

 

This seminar series is part of a research project on How China Shapes the International Economic Order, generously funded by the Westpac Scholars Trust and the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, and led by A/Professor Amy King from the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please contact the event organiser.

Professorial Lecture Series

This public lecture marks the culmination of our Professorial Lecture Series this year, a captivating series of four presentations, all dedicated to honouring our distinguished academics while highlighting their profound contributions to research and education.

 

About the event

Ambitious claims are often made today for big data analytics as the preeminent tool for understanding and predicting human behaviour. In this talk, Professor Benjamin Penny will 'zoom in' to consider the value of a micro- rather than a macro-perspective, focusing on the utility of the specific, the local, and the individual for analysing human society.

A famous aphorism, variously attributed to Roman Jakobson and Nietzsche, has it that philology is the art of reading slowly. It was only after Benjamin had completed many years of his education in Chinese that he realised that reading slowly had been the foundation of his disciplinary practice.

The intense focus philology has on the specific ramifications of each word as we read has been a key methodological underpinning of Benjamin's work. While 'big data' analytics undoubtedly has its value taking the specific instance seriously - a single life, one group of religious practitioners, the small data - can still be beautiful.

 

Agenda

6-7pm Academic lecture

7-7.30pm Networking drinks & canapes

 

About the speaker

Benjamin Penny is a professor of Chinese history and religion in the School of Culture, History and Language at ANU College of Asia and the Pacific. His research examines religious and spiritual movements in modern and contemporary China as well as in medieval times; Taiwanese religion and society, and expatriate society in the treaty ports in the nineteenth century.

Read more about Benjamin's profile here.